Etna; Etna

Day 355, Crotone, 23.071 km

If you want to read with music, here is the original soundtrack (think « Etna » during the chorus, you’ll see it’s like you’re there). 

Then, for those who are worried about my water state, you should know that since my acid pamphlet, my indictment of the water terrorists in these same columns last week, everything is back to normal: the cemeteries are open, the fountains are working, the « points » are back to being water points, I can drink my fill, and I don’t deprive myself of it… Seems that some messages come through…

4 intense days. That’s the least I can say… With the main character, at least for the first two days, the above-mentioned volcano. And as soon as I leave Syracuse, I see it. It will not leave me for 3 days. It crushes everything else from the top of its 3.300 meters. It is present, it is there: Etna. A short transition stage to Catania, where I spend the afternoon walking and preparing the next day’s stage, including eating the most gigantic pizza I’ve ever seen in Italy! (even with my crazy hunger I had difficulties to finish it…). At first I thought I’d go to the top of the volcano with Jay, but some research on the Internet quickly gave me a better idea: rather than struggling on mountain bike tracks, there are two accesses by the road, one to the south / one to the north, it’s a bit tough but it seems doable. After the double ration of Ventoux, a double ration of Etna!

You can’t miss it
Fountain, elephant, church, you can find everything in Catania

Departure in the early morning, after a copious breakfast, for the first ascent, the one of the south side. After a « soft » transition (not excessively flat either) and surprisingly devoid of cars (it must be the Sunday morning effect), we enter in the heart of the matter at the exit of Nicolosi. A regular slope, and quickly the landscape is transformed. I have memories of my trip in Iceland which go back up: the black sand on the side of the road, these tortured forms of rocks staked out by bushes, no doubt, we are near a volcano. With always in line of sight, which dominates us from all up there, the main crater of Etna and behind me the sea which fades away.

Catania and the sea in the distance

Arrived at the Sapienza refuge, at the end of my first ascent of the day, I am a little disappointed: I cannot see the main crater, hidden as it is by other craters. And I don’t dare to leave the bike too long and too out of sight, so a too long hike or a ride in the cable car are excluded. After a few tours of the craters accessible on foot, I say to myself that being « disappointed » is perhaps a bit much, the views are still quite incredible. And I even have the pleasant surprise to meet my breakfast companions who are doing a tour with the hostel’s manager. The world (well, Etna) is small!

You might be able to tell from the previous pictures, but I have a nice descent ahead of me. And the manager of the hostel tells me before leaving: « Be careful, there is a lot of sand on the road – Yes, Yes ». As soon as I say it, I forget it, and I start to ride downhill! And after almost 40 km of climbing, I don’t feel like hitting the brakes. First turn, 40 km/h, I go a little wide, I see at the last moment a pile of sand in the elbow, I feel my rear wheel starting to chase, I don’t dare to brake, nor to turn my handlebars, I see myself going straight into the safety barrier (all this happens of course in a fraction of a second, by the time you read this it has already happened 4 times). But it was only a small pile of sand, I quickly regain grip and a stable attitude. But I understand the « Be careful ». I also understand a little bit what people who told me they were afraid on the downhill can feel. Plus the sand is often in the turns, and I don’t see it until the last moment… 

At the bottom in one piece, I just have time to fill the water bottles and I start the second ascent of the day. A lot in the forest (in the shade, cool) at the beginning, I take advantage of every opportunity where I see the main crater to take a picture of it. Even against the light. Even if it’s the same thing every time. And as I take more and more pictures, I say to myself « Well, it’s funny this cloud, it looks like there’s smoke coming out of the volcano… »

Looking at it more closely, I’m thinking that it’s a rather big cloud, and there are weird noises too. A storm? But the sky is blue all around, I haven’t suddenly become a weather expert, but it doesn’t look like a storm. I finally realize that I am witnessing an eruption of Mount Etna. I would have liked to tell you that I had to avoid torrents of lava, that I had to dodge a rain of molten rock, that thanks to my faithful steed I was able to rescue a family in distress and get them out of the flames of the inferno, but mostly I saw a lot of smoke. And the people around me didn’t look that worried. But it’s still very impressive, so much so that I completely forgot to take pictures of Piano Provenzana, which concludes the ascent of the northern part of Etna. So you will only have pictures of the eruption…

What I didn’t fail to notice, however, is that the double ration of Etna succeeded where the double ration of Ventoux had failed: I have a new record of positive elevation gain in one day: 3.263 m! Most of it in the first 80 kilometers, which incidentally means 40 kilometers of descent, without sand this time, a real treat! I arrive on the coast, in the beautiful village of Taormina. A little dip in the water to refresh myself, and I start to look for a bivouac. As the night is falling and the two paths that are supposed to lead me a little away in the forest are in reality private paths, I end up settling on the side of the road…

Naxos and Taormina
Isola Bella

The next day, I take the road to Messina, give a high five to Poseidon and take the ferry to Italy. And I get the SS106 road again where I had left it, at Villa San Giovanni, and I continue my journey, wind at my back, towards the south of Italy. I notice that Etna has still not left me, it still watches over us from the other side of the strait…

Etna seems to come out of the water

I intend to follow the coast to Crotone, but I see a sign pointing north to the national park of Aspromonte. I remember having noted somewhere that it was worth taking a look at it. So I change my itinerary and decide to go for the mountains! During a water break, I meet a French guy who is also cycling around Italy, in the same direction, and we spend a good moment to discuss. At the moment of leaving, he realizes that his rear wheel is flat, and I abandon him to his repair… The discussion was pleasant and longer than expected, and I begin the first kilometers of the climb at about 18:30. Moreover the wind has risen, against me, and I start to feel my legs. I stop in a supermarket to buy something to improve my dinner (a beer, a piece of cheese and a tray of tomatoes) and while talking with one of the employees in a more than approximate Italian, I finally understand that the road I was going to take is blocked. It’s a bit much. Moreover the alternative road he advises me (and that I follow) goes up very (too?) much, and even if the view on the valley in the descent is rather nice, I’m fed up with it and I stop in the first field where a hedge of trees hides me a little from the road.

The next day, after 450m of flat, I start to climb. It’s hard and it doesn’t stop. When I think I’m at the top, when I say to myself: « there are no more trees above, we won’t be able to climb much higher », I take the next slope at 1000%. And I have the impression that it lasts at least 25 km (probably more around 10). Even if the view on the valley is great, I can’t wait to reach the top…

Then follows a small rolling part, in the forest, which reminds me a bit of the Czech Republic (and the emotional memory of bivouacs in the woods, without cars or neighbors) and I arrive at a crossroads: on the right, I go back down towards the coast and the sea. To the left, I continue in the park, in the mountain, with the promise of other climbs. And of course, I turn left! Forget the last few kilometers, the burning legs and the excruciating climbs. It seems that memory is selective. To convince myself of the validity of my decision, I put together some solid arguments: 1. Very few cars. 2. Fresh water springs to quench my thirst. 3. Between 800 and 1,100 m of altitude, it’s rather 25° than 35°. 4. The higher it is, the more beautiful it is! And a little voice inside me hopes that the upcoming climbs won’t be as horrible as the one in the morning… In the end I got everything right, the hardest was behind and the most beautiful in front…

I only have to cover the short distance that still separates me from Crotone, a matter of half a day. Which doesn’t start well, since I decide to follow the main road, its trucks and other driving enthusiasts, while a small road winds quietly along the cliff. Then I meet a guy who compliments me on my Italian, it’s 9:30 am, I don’t know what he drank but it seems efficient. I even manage to order a meal without a word of English (I’m not sure what I’m eating, but it’s very good), and I don’t have the heart to refuse a coffee when I see the reaction of the chef at the first attempt!

Capo Colonna and its Roman remains
A coffee – No thanks – Are you sure? – Well, ok.

And for those who have trouble keeping up with all these names, a little point on the map: 

Etna, Etna

Jour 355, Crotone, 23.071 km

Si vous voulez lire en musique, voilà la bande originale (pensez « Etna » pendant le refrain, vous verrez on s’y croirait).  

Ensuite, pour ceux qui s’inquièteraient de mon état hydraulique, sachez que depuis mon pamphlet acide, que dis-je, mon réquisitoire en règle envers les terroristes de l’eau dans ces mêmes colonnes la semaine dernière, tout est revenu à la normale : les cimetières sont ouverts, les fontaines fonctionnent, les « points d’ » sont redevenus des points d’eau, je peux boire tout mon saoul, et je ne m’en prive pas… Comme quoi certains messages semblent porter…

4 jours intenses. C’est le moins qu’on puisse dire… Avec en personnage principal, du moins pour les deux premiers jours, le susnommé volcan. Et dès que je sors de Syracuse, je le vois. Il ne va pas me quitter pendant 3 jours. Il écrase tout le reste du haut de ses 3.300 mètres. Il est présent, il est là : l’Etna. Petite étape de transition jusqu’à Catane, où je passe l’après-midi à me promener et à préparer l’étape du lendemain, notamment en mangeant la pizza la plus gigantesque qu’il m’ait été donné de voir en Italie (même avec ma faim de loup j’ai eu du mal à la finir…). Au départ je pensais monter tout en haut du volcan avec Jay, mais quelques recherches sur Internet me donnent assez rapidement une meilleure idée : plutôt que de galérer sur des pistes de VTT, il y a deux accès par la route, un au sud / un au nord, ça fait une journée un peu costaud mais ça semble faisable. Après la double ration de Ventoux, une double ration de l’Etna!

On ne peut pas le rater
Fontaine, éléphant, église, on trouve de tout à Catane

Départ au petit matin, après un petit déjeuner copieux, pour la première ascension, celle du versant sud. Après une transition « douce » (pas excessivement plate non plus) et étonnamment dénuée de voitures (ça doit être l’effet dimanche matin), on rentre dans le vif du sujet à la sortie de Nicolosi. Une pente régulière, et rapidement le paysage se transforme. J’ai des souvenirs de mon périple en Islande qui remontent : le sable noir sur le côté de la route, ces formes torturées des roches piquetées de buissons, pas de doute, on est près d’un volcan. Avec toujours en ligne de mire, qui nous domine depuis tout là-haut, le cratère principal de l’Etna et derrière moi la mer qui s’éloigne.

Catane et la mer dans le lointain

Arrivé au refuge de Sapienza, à la fin de ma première ascension de la journée, je suis un peu déçu : on ne voit pas le cratère principal, caché qu’il est par d’autres cratères. Et je n’ose pas laisser le vélo trop longtemps et trop hors de vue (chat échaudé craint l’eau chaude), donc une trop longue randonnée ou un tour en téléférique sont exclus. Après quelques tours des cratères accessibles à pied, je me dis qu’être « déçu » est peut-être un peu fort, les vues sont tout de même assez incroyables. Et j’ai même l’agréable surprise de croiser mes compagnons de petit déjeuner qui font un tour avec le gérant de l’auberge. Le monde (enfin l’Etna) est petit !

Vous pouvez peut-être le deviner sur les photos précédentes, mais j’ai une belle descente qui m’attend. Et le gérant de l’auberge me glisse avant de partir : « Fais attention, il y a beaucoup de sable sur la route – Oui, Oui ». Aussitôt dit, aussitôt oublié, je me lance à fond dans la descente ! Et après près de 40 km de montée, je n’ai pas envie d’appuyer sur les freins. Premier virage, 40 km/h, je prends un peu large, je vois au dernier moment un tas de sable dans le coude, je sens ma roue arrière qui commence à chasser, je n’ose ni freiner, ni tourner mon guidon, je me vois faire un tout droit dans la barrière de sécurité (tout ça se passe bien sûr en une fraction de seconde, le temps de le lire ça s’est déjà produit 4 fois). Mais ce n’était qu’un petit tas de sable, je retrouve rapidement de l’adhérence et une assiette stable. Mais j’ai compris le « Fais attention ». Je comprends aussi un peu ce que peuvent ressentir les gens qui m’ont dit avoir peur en descente. En plus le sable est souvent dans les virages, et je ne le vois qu’au dernier moment…  

En bas en un seul morceau, j’ai juste le temps de remplir les gourdes et je commence la seconde ascension de la journée. Beaucoup dans la forêt (donc à l’ombre, donc au frais) au départ, je profite de chaque opportunité où je vois le cratère principal pour le prendre en photo. Même à contre-jour. Même si c’est la même chose à chaque fois. Et à force de prendre des photos, je me dis « Tiens, c’est marrant ce nuage, on dirait que le volcan fume… »

En y regardant de plus près, je me dis que c’est quand même un gros nuage, et il y a des bruits bizarres aussi. Un orage ? Pourtant le ciel est bien bleu tout autour, je ne suis pas soudain devenu expert en météo mais ça ne ressemble pas à un orage. Je finis par me rendre à l’évidence : je suis en train d’assister à une éruption de l’Etna. J’aurais aimé vous dire que j’ai dû éviter des torrents de lave, esquiver une pluie de roche en fusion, que grâce à mon fidèle destrier j’ai pu porter secours à une famille en détresse et les sortir des flammes de l’enfer, mais j’ai surtout vu beaucoup de fumée. Et les gens autour de moi n’avaient pas l’air si inquiets que ça. Mais ça reste tout de même très impressionnant, à tel point que j’ai complètement oublié de prendre des photos de Piano Provenzana, qui conclut l’ascension de la partie nord de l’Etna. Vous n’aurez donc que des photos de l’éruption…

Ce que je ne manque pas de remarquer en revanche, c’est que la double ration d’Etna a réussi là où la double ration de Ventoux avait échoué : j’ai un nouveau record de dénivelé positif sur une journée : 3.263 m !! Dont la grande majorité dans les 80 premiers kilomètres, ce qui accessoirement veut dire 40 kilomètres de descente, sans sable en plus cette fois, régal ! J’arrive sur la côte, dans le magnifique village de Taormina. Petit tour dans l’eau pour se rafraichir, et je me mets en quête d’un bivouac. Comme la nuit tombe et que les deux chemins qui sont censés me mener un peu à l’écart dans la forêt sont en réalité des chemins privés, je finis par m’installer sur le bord de la route…

Naxos et Taormina
Isola Bella

Le lendemain, je finis mon tour de Sicile en retournant à Messine, passe faire un coucou à Poséidon et prends le ferry en direction de l’Italie. Et je reprends la route SS106 là où je l’avais laissée, à Villa San Giovanni, et je continue mon périple, vent dans le dos, vers le bout de la botte. Je remarque par ailleurs que l’Etna ne m’a toujours pas quitté, il veille toujours sur nous depuis l’autre côté du détroit…

L’Etna semble sortir de l’eau

Je compte suivre la côte jusqu’à Crotone, mais je vois un panneau qui indique vers le Nord la direction du parc national d’Aspromonte. Je me rappelle avoir noté quelque part qu’il valait le coup d’y jeter un œil. Je change donc mon itinéraire et me décide de me lancer à l’assaut de ses montagnes ! Lors d’un ravitaillement en eau, je croise un français qui fait aussi le tour de l’Italie à vélo, dans le même sens en plus, avec qui on passe un bon moment à discuter. Au moment de repartir, il se rend compte que sa roue arrière est à plat, et je l’abandonne lâchement à sa réparation… La discussion a été agréable et plus longue que prévue, et je commence les premiers kilomètres de montée vers 18h30. En plus le vent s’est levé, de face, et je commence à trouver le temps long. Je m’arrête dans un supermarché pour m’offrir de quoi améliorer mon quotidien (une bière, un morceau de fromage et une barquette de tomates) et en discutant avec un des employés dans un italien plus qu’approximatif, je finis par comprendre que la route que je comptais prendre est bloquée. Ça commence à faire un peu trop. En plus la route alternative qu’il m’a conseillée (et que je suis) monte très (trop ?) fort, et même si la vue sur la vallée dans la descente est plutôt sympa, j’en ai marre et je m’arrête dans le premier champ où une haie d’arbres me cache un peu de la route.

Le lendemain, après 450m de plat, je commence à monter. C’est dur et ça ne s’arrête pas. Quand je pense être arrivé en haut, quand je me dis : « il m’y a plus d’arbres au-dessus, on ne va pas pouvoir monter beaucoup plus haut », je me prends la prochaine pente à 1000%. Et j’ai l’impression que ça dure au moins 25 km (probablement plutôt autour de 10). Même si la vue sur la vallée est grandiose, j’ai hâte d’arriver au sommet…

S’ensuit une petite partie roulante, dans la forêt, qui me rappelle un peu la République Tchèque (et le souvenir ému de bivouacs dans les bois, sans voitures ni voisins) et j’arrive à une croisée des chemins : à droite, je redescends vers la côte et la mer. À gauche, je continue dans le parc, dans la montagne, avec la promesse d’autres montées. Et bien sûr, je prends à gauche ! Oubliés les derniers kilomètres, les jambes qui brûlent et les montées atroces. Il parait que la mémoire est sélective. Pour me convaincre du bien-fondé de ma décision, je fourbis tout de même de solides arguments : 1. Très peu de voitures. 2. Des sources d’eau fraîche à n’avoir plus soif. 3. Entre 800 et 1.100 m d’altitude, il fait plutôt 25° que 35°. 4. Plus c’est haut, plus c’est beau ! Et une petite voix en moi espère que les montées qui arrivent ne seront pas aussi horribles que celle du matin… Au final j’ai eu tout bon, le plus dur était derrière et le plus beau devant…

Il ne me reste plus qu’à parcourir la courte distance qui me sépare encore de Crotone, l’affaire d’une demi-journée. Qui ne commence d’ailleurs pas pour le mieux, vu que je décide de suivre la nationale, ses poids lourds et autres fous du volant alors qu’une petite route serpente tranquillement à flanc de falaise. Je croise ensuite un type qui me complimente sur mon italien, il est 9h30, je ne sais pas ce qu’il a bu mais ça a l’air efficace. Je parviens même en arrivant en ville à me commander un repas sans un mot d’anglais (je ne sais pas trop ce que je mange, mais en tout cas c’est très bon), et je n’ai pas le cœur de refuser un café quand je vois la réaction de la cheffe à première tentative !

Le Capo Colonna et ses vestiges romains
Un café – Non merci – Vous êtes sûr ? – Bon d’accord

Et pour ceux qui ont du mal à suivre avec tous ces noms, un petit point sur la carte :  

The (blue) gold miner

Day 350, Syracuse, 22.453 km

If you haven’t yet read Le Clézio’s book (« Le chercheur d’or ») that I had the good fortune (or bad fortune? I can’t say, but I don’t have any lasting memories of it) to read during my first year of prep school, please do so (unless you really don’t have the time or the inclination to do so), as this article has nothing to do with the original work… Just to give you a little context, imagine that I am constantly thirsty. From the morning when I wake up to the evening when I go to sleep. All the time thirsty. Probably related to the rather high temperatures on this beautiful Sicilian island. Probably. In any case I consume a lot of water, between 6 and 8 liters per day I would say, and so I am constantly looking for a fountain or a cemetery to fill my water bottles. Well, you should know that since a few days, it has become much less easy than it seems (and that it was until now). It seems that in the south of Sicily, in addition to greenhouses, vineyards and beaches, we are also specialists in water points… without water… « points » in short: a nice fountain on the edge of the bike path, no tap. A tub at the bend in the road, no water coming out of the hose. A fountain in a park in a small village, nothing comes out when you turn on the tap. They even go so far as to taunt me: two fountains in a cemetery, with the little puddle of water that implies recent use. CLOSED CEMETERY. So I have to be more inventive: climbing the gates of a stadium to go and drink out of a shower. Asking people (but not 8 liters in one go, I still feel like I’m disturbing sometimes). Buying water (but considering the quantity of empty bottles that litter the roadside, I hesitate to contribute to it)… In short, water is a stake of our future, and I can measure how much a simple and direct access to drinking water is essential… When will the bike with hydraulic assistance be invented??

Since I didn’t have my watch for the last few days (you surely remember this stolen cable story), I feel like it was only a long day between Palermo and Syracuse, with a few outstanding events that stand out. First, the heat. It’s always over 35°, but you get used to it. And then the proximity with the sea, the relative wind that I create by moving, the wind that comes from the sea, all that makes the heat bearable in general. But several times, the road makes a detour inland. This is noticeable in the landscape, which is immediately drier, even if the green vines seem to be happy in these conditions. Then the wind gets warmer. So much so that I feel like I’m standing in front of the open door of a working oven. Like when you check if your cake or quiche is well done. For 30 minutes. Non-stop. The feeling that all the water in my body is evaporating. The thermometer goes up and up. 45 degrees. I don’t know if I’ve ever experienced temperatures like that… 

The furnace
Hotter and hotter

I also have the pleasure to meet a bicycle path! A real one, not on the road, with small shelters to make shade from time to time, « points » (but no water), and even if the road was probably in better condition, it’s quite a nice ride! At the beginning I am wary, I do not know if it goes in the good direction, nor if it is not going to finish abruptly in the middle of nowhere… Then when I see that it follows the same road as me, a little aside, I decide to try. And it’s love at first sight: a gentle slope, uphill or downhill, a pleasant road, in the hills at the beginning and then by the sea, for a good ten kilometers, only water is missing for the idyll to be perfect… I feel that I could follow this track to the end of Sicily. But unfortunately it’s not reciprocal, and I get abandoned just after Maragani. Bad…

The hills
The sea
The end

The sea is there too, almost without interruption. Sometimes kilometers of beach where umbrellas, deckchairs, showers and bars grow. And the people who bathe from morning to evening, at noon too (if I did such a thing, it would be instantaneous skin cancer for me), it must be said that it exceeds 30° from 9 o’clock in the morning. Sometimes grey sand and garbage. Sometimes also cliffs, especially the impressive Scala dei Turchi, a kind of giant staircase that goes down into the sea… And I dare to swim in the evening too, a little freshness break that is often great!

La Scala dei Turchi
Swimming break

Crops too, vines, which apparently like the heat, olive trees, a mixture of both (which I decided to call olivines), and greenhouses. Hectares covered with plastic: I heard that there is a region in the south of Spain (which I avoided by going to the Sierra Nevada) that is nicknamed the sea of plastic (the satellite photos are quite impressive), so I had to go through its Sicilian equivalent. At least I stay at the edge of the « sea »…

The olivines
The two seas

I also have time to walk around Syracuse, as I arrive quite early after a short stop, to meet an Aida liner (based in Hamburg, it’s a small world…), to get lost in the alleys of the island of Ortigia trying to find some shade and freshness, to eat of course, and to enjoy an afternoon without biking…

The cathedral
The fountain of Diana
Ortigia…
… and its alleys

To finish, a little as they come, some pictures of these 4 days…

Le chercheur d’or (bleu)

Jour 350, Syracuse, 22.453 km

Si vous n’avez pas encore lu le livre de Le Clézio que j’ai eu la chance (le malheur ? je ne saurais dire, en tout cas je ne garde pas un souvenir impérissable de cette lecture) de devoir lire lors de ma première année de prépa, faites-le (sauf si vous n’en avez vraiment pas l’envie ni le temps), cet article n’a aucun rapport avec l’œuvre originale… Pour vous donner un peu de contexte, imaginez qu’en ce moment j’ai en permanence soif. Du matin au réveil, au soir quand je me couche. Tout le temps soif. Probablement lié aux températures assez élevées sur cette belle île sicilienne. Probablement. En tout cas je consomme énormément d’eau, entre 8 et 10 litres par jour je dirais, et donc je suis constamment en recherche d’une fontaine ou d’un cimetière pour remplir mes gourdes. Et bien sachez que depuis quelques jours, c’est devenu bien moins facile que ça n’en a l’air (et que ça ne l’était jusqu’à présent). Il semblerait que dans le sud de la Sicile, en plus des serres, des vignes et des plages, on soit aussi spécialiste des points d’eau… sans eau… des « points d’ » en somme : une belle fontaine sur le bord de la piste cyclable, pas de robinet. Un bac au détour d’un virage, pas d’eau qui sort du tuyau. Une fontaine dans un parc dans un petit village, rien qui ne sort quand on ouvre le robinet. Ils poussent même jusqu’à me narguer : deux fontaines dans un cimetière, avec la petite flaque d’eau qui implique une utilisation récente. FERMÉ LE CIMETIÈRE. Du coup je dois redoubler d’inventivité : escalader les grilles d’un stade pour aller boire à une douche. Demander aux gens (mais pas 8 litres d’un coup, j’ai quand même le sentiment que je dérange parfois). Acheter de l’eau (mais au vu de la quantité de bouteilles vides qui jonche les bords de la route j’hésite à apporter ma pierre à l’édifice – excellent jeu de mots au passage)… Bref, l’eau est un enjeu de notre avenir, et je peux mesurer à quel point un accès simple et direct à l’eau potable est primordial… A quand le vélo à assistance hydraulique ??

Vu que je n’avais pas ma montre pour ces derniers jours (vous vous souvenez sûrement de cette histoire de câbles volés), j’ai l’impression qu’il n’y a eu qu’un long jour entre Palerme et Syracuse, avec quelques évènements marquants qui sortent du lot. La chaleur d’abord. Il fait toujours plus de 35°, mais on finit par s’y habituer. Et puis la proximité avec la mer, le vent relatif que je crée en me déplaçant, le vent qui vient du large, tout ça fait que la chaleur reste supportable en général. Mais à plusieurs reprises, la route fait un crochet par l’intérieur des terres. Ça se remarque au paysage, tout de suite plus sec, même si des vignes bien vertes semblent se plaire dans ces conditions. Puis le vent se réchauffe. Tellement que j’ai l’impression d’avoir la tête devant la porte ouverte d’un four en marche. Comme lorsque vous vérifiez si votre gâteau ou votre quiche sont bien cuits. Pendant 30 minutes. Non-stop. La sensation que toute l’eau de mon corps s’évapore. Le thermomètre monte, monte. 45°. Je ne sais pas si j’avais déjà vécu des températures pareilles…  

La fournaise
Toujours plus chaud

J’ai aussi le droit à une piste cyclable ! Une vraie, pas sur la route, avec des petits abris pour faire de l’ombre de temps en temps, des « points d’ » (mais pas d’eau), et même si la route a probablement été en meilleur état, on roule plutôt bien ! Au départ je me méfie, je ne sais pas si elle va dans la bonne direction, ni si elle ne va pas brusquement se terminer en queue de poisson… Puis quand je vois qu’elle suit la même route que moi, un peu à l’écart, je me laisse tenter. Et c’est le coup de foudre : une pente douce, montée ou descente, une route agréable, dans les collines au départ puis au bord de la mer, sur une bonne dizaine de kilomètres, il ne manque que de l’eau pour que l’idylle soit parfaite… Je sens que je pourrais suivre cette piste jusqu’au bout de la Sicile. Mais malheureusement ce n’est pas réciproque, et je me fais lâchement abandonner juste après Maragani. C’est moche…

Les collines
La mer
La fin

La mer est là aussi, presque sans interruption. Parfois des kilomètres de plage où poussent des parasols, des chaises longues, des douches et des bars. Et les gens qui se baignent du matin au soir, le midi aussi (si je faisais une chose pareille, ce serait cancer de la peau instantané pour moi), il faut dire qu’on dépasse les 30° dès 9h le matin. Parfois du sable gris et des poubelles. Parfois aussi des falaises, notamment l’impressionnante Scala dei Turchi, une sorte d’escalier géant qui descend dans la mer… Et j’ose tout de même me baigner le soir, une petit pause fraîcheur qui fait souvent un bien fou !

La Scala dei Turchi
Pause baignade

Des cultures aussi, des vignes, qui aiment apparemment la chaleur, des oliviers, un mélange des deux (que j’ai décidé d’appeler des olivignes), et des serres. Des hectares couverts de plastique : il parait qu’il y a une région dans le sud de l’Espagne (que j’ai évitée en allant dans la Sierra Nevada) qui est surnommée la mer de plastique (les photos satellites sont d’ailleurs assez impressionnantes), et bien je dois passer par son équivalent sicilien. Au moins je reste au bord de la « mer »…

Les olivignes
Les deux mers

J’ai aussi le temps de me promener dans Syracuse, vu que j’arrive assez tôt après une courte étape, d’y croiser un paquebot Aida (basé à Hambourg, le monde est petit…), de me perdre dans les ruelles de l’île d’Ortigia en essayant de trouver un peu d’ombre et de fraîcheur, de manger bien sûr, et de profiter d’une après-midi sans vélo…

La cathédrale
La fontaine de Diane
Ortigia…
… et ses ruelles

Pour finir, un peu comme elles viennent, quelques photos de ces 4 jours…

Cecilia…

Day 346, Palermo, 21.850 km

I can hear the reactions of some of you already: « What? Another article? But it’s only been two days… He should spend more time pedaling than writing his nonsense… » And then right after: « Cecilia. But who is she? What has he been up to again? « . Don’t worry, I’ll make it short for today, anyway, not much has happened in the last two days. And Cecilia is in this case only a song (sorry for those who already saw the concept of « Love is on the bike », it will not be for this time…), a song that has been in my head for a few days (I put the link here, it will save you some searching time). And when I hear the chorus, I hear « Sicilia ». And since I’m in Sicily, it’s worth an article title, isn’t it?

I leave Messina a bit late, I didn’t have the courage to finish the article the night before, so it takes me a bit of time in the morning, and then I have to get ready, pack my stuff, and the already stifling heat doesn’t encourage me to be more active than necessary. I start by following the coastline to Torre Faro, at the end of the northeastern tip of the island. My host told me: « you’ll see, it’s beautiful, very natural, in addition there are two salt lakes that communicate with the sea, a tower, I really recommend it! « Yeah. There are indeed lakes, and on one of them boats and waste. A metal tower too. And a beach. But beautiful would not be necessarily the word that I would have chosen… We take one last look at the continent, then go on with the tour of the island…

The lake, the city of Margi, and the mountains of the continent in the background

The road passes then during some kilometers in the middle of pine trees, very pleasant, especially since the temperature is more clement (it is funny how 32°, a little wind and some clouds make a pleasant temperature…). But quickly, I find myself in the city, in the middle of industrial areas and trucks. Not good. I try to get closer to the beach, but we are more on sad, grey beaches, with big heaps of garbage that hide the sea. Not that great. Even some drops of rain. But really some drops: the time to take out the hood of Jay it stopped raining… Easy. Then comes a small climb that precedes the nice part of the stage: a delicious downhill, on the edge of the cliff, with a light wind at the back and the sun coming out of the clouds… What a pleasure!

I get caught by a group of electric bikes, which gives me the opportunity to make my second joke in Italian, which I have been preparing for a few days. « No elettricita? No, solo pizza i pasta ». The guy gives me a look that says: « What is this guy telling me? « . I rub my belly to add the image to the sound, but it doesn’t seem to convince him… He throws me an embarrassed smile and tells me that he has to join his buddies. Ha Ha Ha. This joke makes me laugh, I’ll have to try it again! In the evening I have a hard time to find a bivouac but finally I find an abandoned factory on the beach: perfect! And moreover I am sheltered from the wind!

The next day, short stage to Palermo. It’s hot again, and I spend the day looking for water to fill my bottles. Fortunately, there is no lack of fountains! I pass many small villages with funny names: yesterday I had Mortelle (deadly in French, not a very cheerful place), Olivieri (all the inhabitants must be called Olivier I guess), Rometta (no resemblance with Rome, except the name), Sparta (sadly, I couldn’t say hi to Leonidas), Tarantonio (in homage to the Italian cousin of the director), and today it’s Finale (yet the road doesn’t stop) and the highlight: Mount San Calogero. I have to climb to the top of a lookout, but I manage to catch it red-handed: it faces the sea (Calogero is a French singer, and one of his hits is “Face à la mer”: facing the sea).

Mount San Calogero, facing the sea, from the lookout of Termini Imerese

I continue to Palermo, with nice views on the sea and the rocks. Once in town, I treat myself to a pizza before going to the hostel. I realize when I leave that someone has been there while I was eating (not even pizza, they only make them in the evening): no more cables to charge my watch and my phone, no more spare battery or charging system connected to the dynamo… That’s going to be a lesson: NEVER leave my bike unattended… And to top it all off, my rear tire is flat.

So I decide to stay one more day in Palermo, to be able to replace what was stolen, to repair my bike and to visit Palermo a bit too…  

Bagheria
The Cathedral of Palermo

Cecillia

Jour 346, Palerme, 21.850 km

J’entends d’ici les réactions de certain-e-s : « Quoi ? Encore un article ? Mais ça fait à peine trois jours… Il devrait passer plus de temps à pédaler qu’à écrire ses âneries… ». Et puis juste après : « Cecilia. Mais qui est-elle ? Qu’est-ce qu’il a été nous inventer encore ? ». Ne vous inquiétez pas, je ferai court pour aujourd’hui, de toute façon il ne s’est pas non plus passé des tonnes d’événements marquants dans les trois derniers jours. Et Cecilia n’est dans ce cas qu’une chanson (désolé pour ceux qui voyaient déjà naître le concept « L’amour est sur le vélo », ce ne sera pas pour cette fois…), une chanson qui me trotte dans la tête depuis quelques jours (je vous mets le lien ici, ça vous évitera de chercher). Et quand j’entends le refrain, j’entends « Sicilia ». Et vu que je suis en Sicile ça valait bien un titre d’article non ?

Je pars un peu tard de Messine, je n’ai pas eu le courage de finir l’article la veille au soir du coup ça me prend un peu de temps le matin, et ensuite il faut se préparer, faire les sacs, et la chaleur déjà étouffante n’incite pas à s’activer plus que de raison. Je commence par suivre la côte jusqu’à Torre Faro, au bout de la pointe Nord-est de l’île. Mon hôte m’a dit : « tu verras, c’est magnifique, très naturel, en plus il y a deux lacs salés qui communiquent avec la mer, une tour, je te le recommande vraiment ! » Mouais. Il y a effectivement des lacs, et sur l’un d’eux des barques et des déchets. Une tour métallique aussi. Et une plage. Mais magnifique ne serait pas forcément le mot que j’aurais choisi… On peut jeter un coup d’œil pour une dernière fois au continent, puis on se lance dans le tour de l’île…

Le lac, la ville de Margi, et les montagnes du continent au fond

La route passe ensuite pendant quelques kilomètres dans la pinède, très agréable, surtout que la température est plus clémente (c’est drôle comment 32°, un peu de vent et quelques nuages font une température agréable…). Mais rapidement, je me retrouve en ville, au milieu des zones industrielles et des camions. Pas top. J’essaye bien de me rapprocher de la plage, mais on est plus sur des plages un peu tristes, grises, avec des gros tas de déchets qui viennent cacher la mer. Moyen. Même quelques gouttes de pluie. Mais vraiment quelques gouttes : le temps de sortir la capuche de Jay il a cessé de pleuvoir… Facile. Puis arrive une petite grimpette qui précède la partie sympa de l’étape : un faux-plat descendant délicieux, en bord de falaise, avec un léger vent de dos et le soleil qui sort des nuages… Que du bonheur !

Je me fais rattraper par un groupe en vélo électriques, ce qui me donne l’occasion de faire ma deuxième blague en italien, que je prépare depuis quelques jours. « No elettricita ? No, solo pizza i pasta ». Le type lance un regard qui dit : « Qu’est-ce qu’il me raconte celui-là ? ». Je me frotte le ventre pour ajouter l’image au son, mais ça n’a pas l’air de le convaincre… Il me lance un sourire gêné et me dit qu’il doit rejoindre ses potes. Ha Ha Ha. Moi elle me fait rire cette blague, il faudra la retenter ! Le soir je galère un peu à trouver un bivouac mais finalement je repère une usine abandonnée en bord de plage : parfait ! Et en plus je suis à l’abri du vent !

Le lendemain, étape courte vers Palerme. Il fait à nouveau une chaleur torride, et je passe la journée à chercher de l’eau pour remplir mes gourdes. Heureusement, ce ne sont pas les fontaines qui manquent ! Je croise plein de petits village avec des noms marrants : hier j’ai eu Mortelle (pas super gai comme ambiance), Olivieri (tous les habitants doivent s’appeler Olivier j’imagine), Rometta (aucune ressemblance avec Rome, si ce n’est le nom), Sparte (je n‘ai malheureusement pas croisé Léonidas), Tarantonio (en hommage au cousin italien du réalisateur), et aujourd’hui c’est Finale (pourtant la route ne s’arrête pas) et le clou du spectacle : le Mont San Calogero. Je dois monter en haut d’un belvédère, mais j’arrive à le prendre sur le fait : il fait face à la mer.

Le mont San Calogero, face à la mer, depuis le belvédère de Termini Imerese

Je continue jusqu’à Palerme, avec de jolies vues sur la mer et les rochers. Arrivé en ville, je m’offre une pizza avant de rejoindre l’auberge de jeunesse. Je me rends compte en repartant que quelqu’un est passé par là pendant que je mangeais (même pas de pizza en plus, ils ne les faisaient que le soir) : plus de câbles pour charger montre et téléphone, plus de batterie d’appoint ni de système de chargement branché à la dynamo… Ça m’apprendra à laisser mon vélo sans surveillance… Et pour couronner le tout, mon pneu arrière est à plat. Quand ça veut pas…

Du coup je décide de rester un jour de plus à Palerme, histoire de pouvoir tranquillement remplacer ce qu’on m’a volé, réparer mon vélo et visiter un peu la ville…

Bagheria
La cathédrale de Palerme

The wheel that turns does not rust

Day 343, Messina, 21.567 km

While searching for a title for this article, I come across this « ancient Greek proverb »: « The wheel that turns does not rust ». Yes, but as far as I’m concerned, it tends (spoiler alert!!) to break. Yes, after the spoke-problems during the first part of my trip, after a wheel change that I thought was going to solve the problem for good, after a tour of the Iberian Peninsula without any problem, my rear wheel, which turns a lot and indeed doesn’t rust, breaks again… And as the first repairman I showed it to said: « New, New ». Basically, I have to change it… Damn Vietnam… That wasn’t its war either…

I suspect something in Naples, as I realized a few days ago that I had cracks on my rear wheel rim. I don’t know where they come from, I wonder if it’s not the « repairer » in Florence who did it while straightening it, or if it’s the fact of having ridden with loose spokes… Anyway I’m watching them carefully and it doesn’t seem to evolve much… So far so good… The start from Naples is again atrocious, 30 kilometers of town, in the middle of a merciless fight between cars and scooters for the road supremacy, difficult for a bike to exist in the middle of all that (and to survive at the same time…). Especially since the first 15 kilometers are on cobblestones. Great! Next time I’ll take a bike with suspension… just to be able to get out of Naples… But then, I have to admit I was a bit disappointed (maybe that’s a bit strong, not convinced) by the Italian coast so far, but this time I got my money’s worth with a superb road along the cliffs that takes me to Vico Equense and Sorrento. I even have, after a nice climb in the middle of a hot summer, nice views of the island of Capri in the distance. Then comes a last turn, and Capri is gone…

Vico Equense
Sorrento

I start then what my aunt described as « sporty but so beautiful »: the Amalfi coast. Indeed, it is sporty. It goes up a lot, it’s very hot, and moreover there are a lot of cars, which don’t always wait for the best moment to pass me. But beside that, the landscape is splendid: a road that goes up in twists and turns on the edge of the cliff, small colored villages that appear at the bend, perched on sheer mountains, small pebble beaches, and turquoise water, almost transparent at times, it is superb!

After Salerno, we’re back to a more classical pattern: kilometers of beach, parking lots, hotels, bars and campsites. And flat, which is a good configuration to finish the day. On the other hand, while checking the state of my wheel in the evening, I realize that one of the cracks of the rim has grown and that one of the spokes is out. Not good… I spend a good half hour trying to fix it, repair it, tighten it, but I feel that it’s beyond my abilities as a mechanic, I’ll have to go and see a repairer tomorrow…

I find one that seems promising on my way, but he has the audacity to close between noon and two. So I hurry up, and enjoy the beautiful views of the sea, of the beautiful villages perched in the mountains or of the same mountains that flow into the sea, and I end up arriving in time at Marina di Camerota. The place I find looks more like a garage, but there seem to be bike parts in a corner. I ask. They tell me in a mixture of Italian and Spanish that « No, we can’t do that. Go to the next village ». First attempt: fail.

Then follows a big climb, but no sign indicating a pass at the top: it seems that for our transalpine friends, 8 km of climb at 6% average does not deserve such a distinction… Then a nice descent to Sapri. This time the store looks more like a bike store as we imagine them, and the mechanic comes to me, looks at my wheel, and says « New, New ». Ok. « Do you have the parts? – No sorry – You know where I can… – No sorry, goodbye ». Cool. We move on. Second attempt: fail. Fortunately there is another repairman in this small town. This one takes a look, goes back to his store, comes back with a new wheel. Gives me the price. Changes the wheel. 14 minutes 30, everything is fixed. I am so relieved that 1. The wheel didn’t collapse under the weight of the bike on a downhill, causing a spectacular and dramatic fall and 2. I didn’t have to order the parts and wait 2 weeks for them to arrive that I feel like growing wings and exclaim « Grazie due mille!!! « . The joke works, I get a smile from the man who offers me two tubes of gel for the road!

I leave with my brand new wheel, and I ride along the Maratean coast (not sure if it’s an official name, but it’s not far from Maratea so we’ll say it works too): it’s almost as nice as the Amalfi coast, it climbs just as much, but it has the advantage of being much less crowded (for the first time in a long time, I ride to the sound of crickets, locusts and other pedals squeaking) and a little bit more wild. Superb!

Moreover I find the perfect place for my bivouac: at the edge of the beach, well sheltered from the wind, and even with a shower! It allows me to finish the day in the water and start the next one with a little swim. A treat! I then follow the « Strada dei Sapori del Medio Tirreno Cosentino », which Google translates into « Strada dei Sapori del Medio Tirreno Cosentino ». It is flat. Mountains on the left. The sea on the right. Straight ahead. Not a shady spot. For more than a hundred kilometers. It is also very hot. Around 11 am, my legs are cut, I wonder why I am doing this. I sweat faster than I drink, I drip everywhere. But I go on anyway. And the temperature eventually drops. I stumble upon the small town of Tropea while looking for a supermarket to improve my dinner with cheese, beer and fruit. Lots of tourists. And with a very nice beach on the edge of the cliff. And a few kilometers further, I find a parking lot with a beautiful lawn, overlooking a beach: perfect! On the other hand, swimming without being able to rinse yourself afterwards: bad idea, don’t do that at home, the night is extremely unpleasant afterwards…

Tropea
My little private beach

The next day, objective Sicily! In spite of an early start, it’s already very hot (28° at 8:30 am) and moreover it climbs and I get a flat tire in the first 10 kilometers: a day that starts well! But after that everything goes well, I even have some clouds in the heights that give a little freshness, the road ends up going down, and the prospect of a short stage gives me wings! Going down to Bagnara Calabra, I have my first glimpse of Sicily in the distance. And at Scilla, the island is so close that it seems possible to go there by swimming (or at least by pedal boat). The temptation is great but I decide to continue to Villa San Giovanni to take a ferry.

Scilla and its beach
Sicily, so close
Jay and Bob are on a boat, who falls in the water?

After a smooth crossing, I found my hostel without any difficulties, and make a small tour of Messina before finding a small restaurant to recover from my emotions. I even have time to be blinded by the statue of Poseidon. Literally…

La roue qui tourne ne rouille pas

Jour 343, Messine, 21.567 km

En cherchant un titre à cet article, je tombe sur ce « proverbe grec antique » : « La roue qui tourne ne rouille pas ». Certes, mais en ce qui me concerne, elle a tendance (attention spoiler !!) à casser. Eh oui, après les rayons qui avaient émaillé la première partie de mon voyage, après un changement de roue qui, pensais-je, allait régler définitivement le problème, après un tour de la péninsule ibérique sans soucis, voilà que ma roue arrière, qui tourne beaucoup et ne rouille effectivement pas, me lâche à nouveau… Et comme me dit le premier réparateur à qui je la montre : « New, New ». En gros il faut changer… Foutu Vietnam… C’était pas sa guerre non plus…

Je me doute un peu de quelque chose à Naples, je me suis rendu compte depuis quelques jours que j’avais des fissures sur la jante de ma roue arrière. Je ne sais pas d’où elles viennent, je me demande si c’est pas le « réparateur » à Florence qui a fait ça en me la redressant, ou alors c’est le fait d’avoir roulé avec des rayons détendus… En tout cas je les observe attentivement et ça n’a pas l’air de bouger… Jusqu’ici tout va bien… Le départ de Naples est à l’image de l’arrivée dans la ville: atroce. 30 kilomètres au milieu d’un combat sans merci entre les voitures et les scooters pour la maîtrise de la route, difficile pour un vélo d’exister au milieu de tout ça (et de survivre par la même occasion…). Surtout que les 15 premiers kilomètres se font sur les pavés. Génial ! La prochaine fois je prendrai un vélo avec suspension… juste pour pouvoir sortir de Naples… Mais ensuite, moi qui avait été jusque-là un peu déçu (c’est peut-être un peu fort, pas convaincu plutôt) par la côte italienne, j’en ai cette fois pour mon argent avec une superbe route en bord de falaise qui m’amène vers Vico Equense et Sorrento. J’ai même, après une belle montée en plein cagnard, de jolies vues sur l’île de Capri au loin. Puis arrive un dernier virage, et Capri, c’est fini…

Vico Equense
Sorrento

On passe ensuite à ce que ma tante décrivait comme « sportive mais tellement belle » : la côte Amalfitaine. Effectivement, c’est sportif. Ça monte beaucoup, il fait très chaud, et en plus il y a plein de voitures, qui n’attendent pas toujours le meilleur moment pour me dépasser. Mais à côté de ça, le paysage est splendide : une route qui s’élève en lacets en bord de falaise, des petits villages colorés qui apparaissent au détour d’un virage, perchés sur des montagnes à pic, des petites plages de galets, et une eau turquoise, quasiment transparente par moments, c’est superbe !

Après Salerno, on retrouve un schéma plus classique : des kilomètres de plage, de parkings, des hôtels, des bars et des campings. Plus plat aussi, une bonne configuration pour finir la journée. En revanche, en vérifiant l’état de ma roue le soir, je me rends compte qu’une des fissures de la jante s’est agrandie et qu’un des rayons en est sorti. Pas bien… Je passe une bonne demi-heure à essayer de remettre, réparer, resserrer, mais je sens bien que ça dépasse mes capacités de mécano, il va falloir aller voir un réparateur demain…

J’en repère un qui me paraît prometteur sur ma route, mais qui a l’outrecuidance de fermer entre midi et deux. Je me dépêche donc, et profite tout de même des belles vues qui me sont offertes sur la mer, sur des jolis villages perchés dans les montagnes ou sur ces mêmes montagnes qui se jettent dans la mer, et je finis par arriver à temps à Marina di Camerota. L’endroit que je trouve ressemble plus à un garage, mais il y a l’air d’y avoir des pièces de vélo dans un coin. Je demande. On me répond dans un mélange d’italien et d’espagnol que « Non, on peut pas faire. Allez voir au village d’après ». Première tentative : échec.

S’ensuit une grosse montée, mais pas de panneau indiquant un col au sommet : il semblerait que pour nos amis transalpins, 8 km de montée à 6% de moyenne ne mérite pas une telle distinction… Puis une belle descente vers Sapri. Cette fois la boutique ressemble plus à un magasin de vélo comme on se les imagine, et le mécano vient me voir, regarde ma roue, et me dit « New, New ». Ok. « Vous avez les pièces ? – Non désolé – Vous savez où je peux… – Non désolé, au revoir ». Cool. On avance. Deuxième tentative : échec. Heureusement il y a un autre réparateur dans cette petite ville. Celui-là regarde, repart dans son magasin, revient avec une roue neuve. Me donne le prix. Me change la roue. 14 minutes 30, tout est réglé. Je suis tellement soulagé que 1. La roue ne se soit pas affaissée sous le poids du vélo dans une descente, causant une chute spectaculaire et dramatique et 2. Il n’ait pas fallu commander les pièces et attendre 2 semaines que celles-ci arrivent que je me sens pousser des ailes et m’exclame « Grazie due mille !! ». La blague porte, j’arrache un sourire au monsieur qui en plus m’offre deux tubes de gel pour la route !

Je repars avec ma roue toute neuve, et je passe par la côte maratéennne (pas certain que ce soit une appellation officielle, mais c’est pas loin de Maratea alors on va dire que ça marche aussi) : c’est presque aussi joli que la côte amalfitaine, ça monte autant, mais ça a l’avantage d’être beaucoup moins fréquenté (pour la première fois depuis longtemps, je monte au son des grillons, criquets et autres pédales qui grincent) et un peu plus sauvage. Superbe !

En plus je trouve le coin parfait pour mon bivouac : au bord de la plage, bien abrité du vent, et même avec une douche ! Ça permet de finir la journée par un tour dans l’eau et de commencer la suivante par une petite baignade. Un régal ! Je suis ensuite la « Strada dei Sapori del Medio Tirreno Cosentino », ce que Google me traduit par « Strada dei Sapori del Medio Tirreno Cosentino ». C’est plat. Des montagnes à gauche. La mer à droite. Tout droit. Pas un coin d’ombre. Pendant plus d’une centaine de kilomètres. Il fait très chaud aussi. Vers 11h, j’ai les jambes coupées, je me demande pourquoi je fais ça. Je transpire plus vite que je ne bois, je goutte de partout. Mais j’avance quand même. Et la température finit éventuellement par baisser. Je tombe un peu par hasard, en cherchant un supermarché pour améliorer mon dîner de fromage, d’une bière et de fruits, sur la petite ville de Tropea. Blindée de touristes. Et avec une très jolie plage en bord de falaise. Et quelques kilomètres plus loin, je me trouve un parking avec une superbe pelouse, le tout qui surplombe une plage : parfait ! En revanche se baigner sans pouvoir se rincer ensuite : mauvaise idée, ne faites pas ça chez vous la nuit est extrêmement désagréable ensuite…

Tropea
Ma petite plage privée

Le lendemain, objectif Sicile ! Malgré un départ assez tôt, il fait déjà très chaud (28° à 8h30) et en plus ça grimpe et je crève dans les 10 premiers kilomètres : une journée qui commence bien ! Mais après ça tout se passe bien, j’ai même quelques nuages dans les hauteurs qui donnent un peu de fraicheur, la route finit bien évidemment par redescendre, et la perspective d’une étape courte me donne des ailes ! En descendant vers Bagnara Calabra, j’ai mon premier aperçu de la Sicile dans le lointain. Et à Scilla, l’île est si proche qu’il semblerait possible d’y aller à la nage (ou du moins en pédalo). La tentation est grande mais je me résous à continuer jusqu’à Villa San Giovanni pour prendre un ferry.

Scilla et sa plage
La Sicile, si près
Jay et Bob sont sur un bateau, qui tombe à l’eau ?

Après une traversée sans histoires, je trouve mon auberge sans difficultés, et fais un petit tour de Messine avant de me trouver un petit restaurant pour me remettre de mes émotions. J’ai même le temps d’être ébloui par la statue de Poséidon. Littéralement…

Pizzas like they were falling from the sky

Day 339, Naples, 20.954 km

I had already slightly adapted my diet since my arrival in Italy, with a more and more preponderant place given to pasta and pizzas. But with still a bit of variety, in a desire to also enjoy local specialties. Since I’m in Naples, and Etienne can testify to this, as he has the right to a photographic report of each of my meals, I have a very balanced diet based only on pizza and ice cream. At the rate of 2 or 3 pizzas and 2 ice creams per day. I’m glad I’m not staying too long and that I’m going to get back on my bike soon, otherwise I’ll be rooting around here pretty quickly…

Before that, I enjoyed the Eternal City, and I even added a country to my list: the Vatican. No interview with Francis though, I guess talking to a bearded man, a bicycle and a plastic dragon didn’t seem appropriate for the middle of June…

The sun sets on the Vatican…

The next day, departure at dawn and before the heat, and in spite of the fact that it is a Saturday morning, there are many cars on the road. Not the most pleasant moment when leaving the city but it doesn’t last. And I also pass clusters of Saturday cyclists, almost all of whom have a small gesture or kind word. It makes the road much more pleasant than these cars that overtake me in a hurry…

I also find the sea. I don’t know if I was too spoiled in Spain and Portugal, but I find it hard to get excited about kilometers of beach, with the thousands of umbrellas and kilometers of cars parked on the road that go with it… Fortunately, there is from time to time a small island or a mountain that breaks the disenchantment. But overall I miss the cliffs, the small creeks and the feeling of having the sea all to myself… Maybe for later…

I’m waiting for people to go back home before stopping on the beach and taking a dip. At least I have again the feeling that the sea belongs to me. And the feeling of leaving a whole day of sweat behind me is not unpleasant either. I find a small place to bivouac, close to the sea, with the firm intention to enjoy it from the first hour of the next day… No luck, I am woken up by an army of ants, fortunately they don’t sting but they are so invasive that I flee as fast as possible… We will swim later.

Maybe not today in fact, it seems that all the Italians have decided to go to the beach: the road is completely blocked in the opposite direction, and it is only 9:30 am. It is good to move by bike at last! I meet another cyclist, Santorin (I’m not sure of his first name, I forgot it when he introduced himself, I hope he won’t mind too much), who happens to work in aeronautics (it’s a small world) and who rides with me for a while. He praises the beauty of the beach we are riding along, laughs at the fact that everybody wants to go there at the same time, and when I ask him if we can get closer to the sea, he shows me the way. Unfortunately, we see more parking lots and private clubs than beach. And when we see the beach, it’s not necessarily from the best angle…

Miles of traffic jam in the morning!
Not the best view of the sea…

We pass then on a bridge closed to the traffic because it threatens to collapse… Not reassuring, especially considering the latest events with bridges in Italy, but in the end nothing particular to announce. We even have a pretty sight on the lake of Averno when arriving at Pozzuoli, where Santorin takes me around for a tour of the old city and its port, offers me a coffee and brings me to the edge of the beach before making a U-turn and returning at home. Nice!

The lake of Averno
The sea front in Pozzuoli

Then I have about ten kilometers to go to Naples, and not the easiest ones… While the road has been relatively flat and clean until now, I have to go up on the heights of the city and go down on cobblestones… With my stories of broken wheels and spokes, I am not reassured, but in the end nothing to report and I arrive without any problem at the hostel. The guy at the reception recommends me to go up to the Castel Sant’Elmo, which offers superb 360° views on the city and the bay. What he didn’t say was that you have to climb about 20,000 steps to get there and as it’s still 30°. At one moment, I wonder if I shouldn’t have waited a bit more before taking my shower for the week… In his defense, the views are really magnificent…

The bay and the island of Capri
Mount Vesuvius which dominates the city and the port

I then walk around the city before eating my second pizza of the day: it’s dirty, it stinks, it’s noisy, but so alive: music everywhere, people trying to sell souvenirs, antiques, books, a little bit of everything and nothing. Hustlers shouting to attract tourists to their restaurants. And next to that, empty streets, with dozens of scooters and colored sheets hanging from the balconies… I really like it…

The next day, following the advice of the receptionist of the hostel, I leave Jay at the parking lot and I take the train to go to Pompeii. A place that I had only seen in pictures in history books until now. And I am not disappointed: a real maze, mosaics and other perfectly preserved wall decorations, the impression of being able to close my eyes and imagine people walking in these streets, all under the (benevolent?) glance of Mount Vesuvius…

Pompeii and Vesuvius in the background
The amphitheater
With such crosswalks the cars would have to slow down !
View on the city from the forum

Des pizzas comme s’il en pleuvait…

Jour 339, Naples, 20.954 km

J’avais déjà légèrement adapté mon régime depuis mon arrivée en Italie, avec une place de plus en plus prépondérante donnée aux pâtes et aux pizzas. Mais avec un peu de variété tout de même, dans une volonté de profiter aussi des spécialités locales. Depuis que je suis à Naples, et mon frère pourra en témoigner, lui qui a le droit à un reportage photographique de chacun de mes repas, j’ai un régime très équilibré à base uniquement de pizza et de glace. Au rythme de 2 ou 3 pizzas et 2 glaces par jour. Heureusement que je ne reste pas trop longtemps et que je vais vite me remettre au vélo, sinon je prendrai assez rapidement racine ici…

Avant cela, j’ai bien profité de la ville éternelle, parcourue de long en large, et j’ai même été jusqu’à ajouter un pays à ma liste : le Vatican. Pas d’entrevue avec François par contre, j’imagine que le fait de s’entretenir avec un barbu, un vélo et un dragon en plastique ne lui a pas paru opportun pour le milieu du mois de juin…

Le soleil se couche sur le Vatican…

Le lendemain, départ aux aurores et à la fraiche, et malgré le fait que ce soit un samedi matin, il y a plein de voitures sur la route. Pas le plus agréable des moments quand il s’agit de sortir de la ville mais ça ne dure pas. Et je croise aussi des grappes de cyclistes du samedi, qui ont quasiment tous un petit geste ou un mot gentil. Ça rend le chemin bien plus agréable…

Je retrouve aussi la mer. Je ne sais pas si j’ai été trop gâté en Espagne et au Portugal, mais j’ai du mal à m’enthousiasmer devant des kilomètres de plage, avec les milliers de parasols et les kilomètres de voitures garées sur la route qui vont avec… Heureusement, il y a de temps en temps une petite île ou une montagne qui vient rompre le désenchantement. Mais globalement je regrette les falaises, les petites criques et la sensation d’avoir la mer pour moi tout seul… Peut-être pour plus tard…

J’attends que les gens commencent à rentrer chez eux avant de m’arrêter sur la plage et d’aller piquer une tête. Au moins j’ai à nouveau le sentiment que la mer m’appartient. Et l’impression de laisser toute une journée de sueur derrière moi n’est pas désagréable non plus. Je me trouve un petit coin pour bivouaquer, à deux pas de la mer, avec la ferme intention d’en profiter dès la première heure le lendemain… Pas de chance, je suis réveillé par une armée de fourmis, elles ne piquent heureusement pas mais sont tellement envahissantes que je fuis sans demander mon reste… On se baignera plus tard.

Peut-être pas aujourd’hui en fait, il semble que tous les italiens aient décidé de se rendre à la plage : la route est complètement bloquée dans le sens inverse, et il n’est que 9:30 du matin. Il fait bon se déplacer en vélo au final ! Je croise un autre cycliste, Santorin (je ne suis pas certain du prénom, il faut dire que je l’ai oublié au moment où il s’est présenté, j’espère qu’il ne m’en voudra pas trop), qui s’avère travailler dans l’aéronautique (le monde est petit) et qui fait un petit bout de chemin avec moi. Il me vante la beauté de la plage que nous sommes en train de longer, s’esclaffe devant le fait que tout le monde veuille y aller au même moment, et quand je lui demande si on peut se rapprocher de la mer me montre le chemin. Malheureusement, on voit plus de parkings et de clubs privés que de plage. Et quand on voit la plage, ce n’est pas forcément sous le meilleur angle…

Des kilomètres de bouchons de bon matin !!
Pas la meilleure vue de la mer…

On passe ensuite sur un pont fermé à la circulation car il menace de s’écrouler… Pas rassurant, surtout au vu de l’actualité des ponts en Italie, mais au final rien de particulier à signaler. On a même une jolie vue sur le lac d’Averno en arrivant à Pozzuoli, où Santorin me fait faire un tour de la vieille ville et de son port, m’offre un café et m’amène au bord de la plage avant de faire demi-tour et de rentrer chez lui. Sympa !

Le lac d’Averno
Le front de mer à Pozzuoli

Me restent ensuite une dizaine de kilomètres à faire jusqu’à Naples, et pas les plus faciles… Alors que jusqu’à présent la route a été relativement plate et propre, je dois monter sur les hauteurs de la ville et redescendre sur les pavés… Avec mes histoires de rayons détendus je ne suis pas rassuré, mais au final rien à signaler et j’arrive entier à l’auberge de jeunesse. Le type de la réception me recommande de monter au Castel Sant’Elmo, qui offre de superbes vues à 360° sur la ville et sur la baie. Ce qu’il ne précise pas, c’est qu’il faut monter à peu près 20.000 marches pour y arriver et comme il fait encore 30°, je me demande si j’aurais pas dû encore attendre un peu avant de prendre ma douche de la semaine… Pour sa défense, les vues sont vraiment magnifiques…

La baie et l’île de Capri
Le mont Vésuve qui domine la ville et le port

Je me promène ensuite dans la ville avant de déguster ma deuxième pizza de la journée. Les rues sont sales, ça pue, c’est bruyant, mais tellement vivant : de la musique partout, des gens qui essayent de vendre des souvenirs, des antiquités, des livres, un peu de tout et de rien. Des rabatteurs qui s’égosillent pour rameuter les touristes dans leurs restos. Et à côté de ça des ruelles vides, avec des dizaines de scooters et des draps de couleurs qui pendent des balcons… Un vrai coup de cœur…

Le lendemain, suivant les conseils du réceptionniste de l’auberge, je laisse sagement Jay au parking et je prends le train pour me rendre à Pompéi. Un lieu que je n’avais jusqu’à présent que vu en photo dans les livres d’Histoire. Et je ne suis pas déçu : un vrai dédale, des mosaïques et autres décorations murales parfaitement conservées, l’impression de pouvoir fermer les yeux et d’imaginer des gens marcher dans ces rues, le tout sous le regard (bienveillant ?) du mont Vésuve…

Pompéi et le Vésuve en arrière-plan
L’amphitéatre
Avec des passages piétons pareils les voitures seraient obligées de ralentir !
Vue sur la ville depuis le forum