On the road of Le Tour

Day 294, Toulouse, 17.377 km

There was the alpine stage, with Sandrine and Le B this fall. And there was the Pyrenean stage in spring, this time alone and without the sweater (lost in Sevilla) nor the tie (I had borrowed the one from Le B at the time). The purists will point out that the stage took place on a Tuesday, and that the “Pull-Cravate” is only required on Fridays, but the gesture would have been appreciated anyway, I guess. Without Eve’s help to carry the heaviest luggage either. I was able to recognize part of the route of the Tour de France this summer: I can confirm that the roads are passable, sometimes even new. On the other hand, I am not sure if I will be able to finish in the required time…

So I leave Pau in the early morning, after a champion’s breakfast. The weather is nice, not too hot, there is a little wind at the back, the conditions are ideal. The day’s program is rough: the Tourmalet pass, then the Aspin pass before a forest corner to bivouac somewhere in the Neste valley. I follow a bike path after the exit of Pau that is supposed to take me to Lourdes. But it makes a little too many turns and detours for my taste so I fall back on the departmental road: I am not in the mood to stroll in the fields along the Gave but my legs are itching at the idea of climbing the Tourmalet. Straight to Lourdes! I take a short break in a bakery in the city center and get back on the road. The bike path is straight this time, and I can see the snowy peaks of the Pyrenees in the distance, the excitement is building up! I take another break in Pierrefitte-Nestalas before starting the climb! 

The Gave in Nay
Pierrefitte and the approaching mountains

At the exit of the village, I see a sign that says: « Col du Tourmalet: Closed ». It is written in capital letters, in red, impossible to miss. I look a bit on the internet, the Aspin pass seems to be closed too. Bloody hell. Looking a bit further, I read that the Tourmalet is closed because a ski resort uses the space (including roads) during the winter. As for the Aspin, it is often because of the weather conditions that it is blocked. I tell myself that the weather has been nice for a few days, and that today’s sun will have melted any residual snow, and I certainly don’t want to turn back. So I decide to continue to climb the pass until the road is blocked and then I’ll see what happens…

I first go through some nice gorges to get to Luz-Saint-Sauveur. The road doesn’t go up too much and I even have the wind at my back. Easy. Then begins the real ascent of the pass. It climbs quite regularly, it’s straight, and I have the snowy summits in my back and in front of me. A real treat. Some cars pass me, sign that the road is not blocked right away, some gendarmes too, who come back down a little later… A man in a car stops and reminds me that the pass is closed. I ask him if there is not a path or a small road that allows to go through anyway. He answers me « You surely know better than me… ». Well precisely no, that’s why I ask… I pass a large parking lot and a cable car, but still no barrier that blocks the road. The slope gets a little harder but remains regular. I go up…

These mountains still looking at me…
We enter in the heart of the subject

At 5km from the summit, the dreaded barrier finally arrives. Red and white, with signs forbidding cars, bikes and pedestrians to pass. It’s hard to pretend not to have seen it… The road looks clear, clean. I hesitate to pass. There is a man in his truck who is cleaning the edges. I start the conversation: « Hello sir, I see that the road is closed, but do you think it would be possible to pass? I come from far away, and if I don’t make this pass today, I don’t know if I’ll make it one day… – It’s at your own risk. The road is clean, and moreover today the weather is good. On the other hand, if you meet the gendarmes, you’ll have to handle responsibility. Driving on a closed road, the fine may be high. Especially since it will reopen tomorrow…  » It’s 16:30, I don’t want to pitch my tent and wait for the next day. Moreover the landscapes are already magnificent, and I feel that the rest of the road will be even better. And then, one more ban to brave, it will not be the first, nor probably the last time that it happens. And if I meet the police, at best I could manage to convince them with my story, at worst I pay the fine. Good decision, the end of the climb is amazing… Incredible… Wonderful…

I arrive at the top of the pass, the view is unfortunately a bit blocked on the other side. And the ski resort of La Mongie is not the most beautiful to see either: a huge building in the middle of the valley. Not so nice. I put on my coat and start the descent. A treat. And a little rest for the legs before starting the Aspin pass. And above all, not a gendarme on the horizon. I turn off at Sainte-Marie de Campan and start the climb. I meet some cyclists to whom I ask if we can go through the pass. Apparently yes. It seems that luck is on my side today!

The pass is a bit strange, it goes up, very hard, then it’s flat, it goes down again, it goes up a bit more then it’s flat again. I have a bit of trouble to get into a rhythm. Then comes a new barrier, this time without a sign. If someone asks, I will say that I thought that the ban was only valid for cars… I also start the hardest part of the climb: twists and turns in the forest, twists and turns again and again. But I am encouraged by wild animals: deers, squirrels, birds, which pass on the road while watching me giving blood, sweat and tears to hoist Jay on top of the pass…

The end of the climb
Nice view on the Neste valley

The reason for the closure of the pass becomes clear when I reach the top: roadworks. Apparently the Tour de France is coming this summer so the road has to be refurbished. And new it is, in the first 8 km of the descent. So I let off the brakes and enjoy. Long straight lines on the still warm asphalt. Not bad. I arrive in the valley, find a water point to fill my bottles. I start looking for a place to sleep at night when I meet Alex: « Do you know where you are going? – Toulouse – And tonight? I’m going to find a place a little further in the forest I think – Come to sleep at home if you want! « . Alex, Charles and Germain live in Sarrancolin, they like red wine, pasta with pesto and board games, they even have hot water and a free bed, all the ingredients are gathered to spend an excellent evening!

The theme of the next day: F.L.A.T. Looking at my little notebook, I realized that I had just completed 17 (!!) stages with more than 1.000m of ascent per day. And the stage of the day announces 600m of climb for 1.000m of descent. I sign with both hands. I leave the Neste valley and find the Garonne. I have the impression to have the wind at my back all the time. But no, it’s the effect of riding on the flat. I follow the Garonne cycle route, but I almost never see the river. Except when I cross it.

Crossing the Garonne at Couladère
Straight and flat…

A bit of wind at the end of the stage, but the prospect of meeting friends and family, and spending a weekend of rest in Toulouse gives me wings and I arrive at Diana and Alex’s house in less time than it takes to write this. Extended weekend now!

To finish I’ll give you another dose of Tourmalet, I think I’m still in shock…

Sur la route du Tour

Jour 294, Toulouse, 17.377 km

Il y avait eu l’étape alpestre, avec Sandrine et le B cet automne. Il y aura eu l’étape pyrénéenne au printemps, seul et sans pull (perdu à Séville) ni cravate (j’avais à l’époque emprunté celle du B) cette fois. Les puristes me feront remarquer que l’étape s’est déroulée un mardi, et que le pull-cravate n’est de rigueur que le vendredi, mais le clin d’œil eût été apprécié tout de même, j’imagine. Sans l’aide d’Eve pour transporter le plus lourd des bagages non plus. J’ai pu reconnaitre une partie du parcours du Tour de France de cet été : je peux confirmer que les routes sont praticables, parfois même neuves. En revanche, je ne suis pas certain d’être parvenu à finir dans les délais…

Je pars donc de Pau au petit matin, après un petit déjeuner de champion. Il fait beau, pas trop chaud, il y a un petit vent de dos, les conditions sont idéales. Le programme de la journée est corsé : le col du Tourmalet puis le col d’Aspin avant un coin de forêt pour bivouaquer quelque part dans la vallée de la Neste. Je suis une voie cyclable après la sortie de Pau qui est censée m’amener à Lourdes, mais elle fait un peu trop de tours et détours à mon goût donc je me rabats sur la départementale : je ne suis pas trop d’humeur à flâner dans les champs au bord du Gave mais j’ai les jambes qui fourmillent à l’idée de grimper le Tourmalet. Tout droit jusqu’à Lourdes ! Je fais une petite pause dans une boulangerie du centre-ville et je me remets en route. La voie cyclable est toute droite cette fois, et je vois les sommets enneigés des Pyrénées au loin, l’excitation monte !! Je fais une nouvelle pause à Pierrefitte-Nestalas avant de me lancer dans l’ascension !  

Le Gave à Nay
Pierrefitte et les montagnes qui se rapprochent

Au rond-point à la sortie du village, je vois un panneau qui indique : « Col du Tourmalet : Fermé ». C’est écrit en majuscule, en rouge, impossible à manquer. Je regarde un peu sur internet, le col d’Aspin serait aussi fermé. Quel enfer. En cherchant un peu plus, il est écrit que le Tourmalet est fermé car une station de ski utilise l’espace (y compris les routes) pendant l’hiver. Quant à l’Aspin, c’est souvent à cause des conditions météo qu’il est bloqué. Je me dis qu’il fait beau depuis quelques jours, et que le soleil d’aujourd’hui aura fait fondre tout résidu de neige, et je n’ai surtout pas envie de faire demi-tour. Je décide donc de continuer à monter le col jusqu’à ce que la route soit bloquée et d’aviser ensuite…

Je passe d’abord dans de jolies gorges pour arriver à Luz-Saint-Sauveur. La route ne monte pas trop et j’ai même le vent dans le dos. Facile. Commence ensuite la véritable montée du col. Ça grimpe assez régulièrement, c’est tout droit, et j’ai les sommets enneigés dans mon dos et devant moi. Un régal. Des voitures me doublent, signe que la route n’est pas bloquée tout de suite, des gendarmes aussi, qui eux redescendent un peu après… Un monsieur en voiture s’arrête et me rappelle que le col est fermé. Je lui demande s’il n’y a pas un chemin ou une petite route qui permet de passer quand même. Il me répond « Vous savez surement mieux que moi… » Eh bien justement non, c’est pour ça que je demande… Je passe un grand parking et un téléférique, mais toujours pas de barrière qui bloque la route. La pente se durcit un peu mais reste régulière. Je monte…

Toujours ces montagnes qui me regardent…
On rentre dans le vif du sujet

A 5km du sommet, la barrière tant redoutée finit par arriver. Rouge et blanche, avec des panneaux interdiction de passer pour les voitures, les vélos et les piétons. Difficile de prétendre ne pas l’avoir vue… La route a l’air dégagé, propre. J’hésite à passer. Il y a monsieur dans son camion qui est en train d’en nettoyer les bords. J’engage la conversation : « Bonjour monsieur, je vois bien que la route est fermée, mais vous pensez que ce serait tout de même possible de passer ? Je viens de loin, et si je ne fais pas ce col aujourd’hui je ne sais pas si je le ferai un jour… – C’est à vos risques et périls. La route est propre, et en plus aujourd’hui il fait beau. En revanche si vous croisez les gendarmes, il va falloir assumer. Rouler sur une route fermée, l’amende risque d’être salée. Surtout qu’elle doit rouvrir demain… » Il est 16h30, je n’ai pas envie de planter ma tente et d’attendre le lendemain. En plus les paysages sont déjà magnifiques, et je sens que le reste de la route va être encore mieux. Et puis un interdit de plus à braver, ce ne sera ni la première, ni probablement la dernière fois que ça arrive. Et si je croise les gendarmes, au mieux j’arrive à les amadouer avec mon histoire, au pire je paye l’amende. Je fais bien, la fin de la montée est grandiose… Incroyable… Magnifique…

J’arrive au sommet du col, la vue est malheureusement un peu bouchée de l’autre côté. Et la station de ski de la Mongie n’est pas non plus la plus belle à voir : une énorme barre d’immeubles en plein milieu de la vallée. Bof. J’enfile mon manteau et me lance dans la descente. Un régal. Et un peu de repos pour les jambes avant d’entamer le col d’Aspin. Et surtout, pas un gendarme à l’horizon. Je bifurque à Sainte-Marie de Campan et je commence la montée. Je croise des cyclistes à qui je demande si on peut passer par le col. Apparemment oui. On dirait que la chance est de mon côté aujourd’hui !

Le col est un peu bizarre, ça monte, très fort, puis c’est plat, ça redescend, ça monte encore un peu puis encore du plat. J’ai un peu de mal à me mettre dans le rythme. Puis arrive une nouvelle barrière, cette fois sans panneau. On dira que je pensais que l’interdiction n’était valable que pour les voitures… J’entame aussi la partie plus dure de la montée : des lacets dans la forêt, encore et encore des lacets. Mais je me fais encourager par les animaux sauvages : biches, écureuils, oiseaux, qui passent tour à tour sur la route en me regardant suer sang et haut pour hisser Jay en haut du col…

La fin de la montée
Belle vue sur la vallée ennuagée

La raison de la fermeture du col devient claire quand j’atteins le sommet : des travaux. Apparemment le Tour de France passe cet été donc la route doit être remise à neuf. Et neuve elle est, dans les 8 premiers kilomètres de la descente. Du coup je lâche les freins et je profite. De grandes lignes droites sur le bitume encore tiède. Pas mal. J’arrive dans la vallée, trouve un point d’eau pour remplir mes gourdes. Je commence à chercher un endroit où dormir la nuit quand je croise Alex : « Tu sais où tu vas ? – Toulouse – Et ce soir ? Je vais me trouver un coin un peu plus loin dans la forêt je pense – Viens dormir à la maison si tu veux ! ». Alex, Charles et Germain habitent à Sarrancolin, aiment le vin rouge, les pâtes au pesto et les jeux de société, ils ont même l’eau chaude et un lit de libre, tous les ingrédients sont réunis pour passer une excellente soirée !

Le thème de la journée du lendemain : P.L.A.T. En regardant mon petit carnet, je me suis rendu compte que je venais d’enchainer 17 (!!) étapes avec plus de 1.000m de dénivelé par jour. Et l’étape du jour annonce 600m de montée pour 1.000m de descente. Je signe des deux mains. Je sors de la vallée de la Neste et retrouve la Garonne. J’ai l’impression d’avoir le vent dans le dos en permanence. Mais non, c’est l’effet que ça fait de rouler sur le plat. Je suis l’itinéraire cyclable de la Garonne, mais je ne vois quasiment jamais le fleuve. Sauf quand je le traverse.

Traversée de la Garonne à Couladère
Tout droit, et tout plat…

Un peu de vent sur la fin de l’étape, mais la perspective de retrouver les copains et la famille, et de passer un weekend de repos à Toulouse me donne des ailes et j’arrive chez Diana et Alex en moins de temps qu’il ne faut pour l’écrire. Weekend prolongé maintenant !

Pour finir je vous remets une petite dose de Tourmalet, je crois que je suis encore sous le choc…

La Vuelta de Iberica!

Day 290, Pau, 17.066 km

And that’s it. With this new stopover in Pau at Marie and Florent’s, I completed my tour of the Iberian Peninsula. It was mountainous (a lot), rainy (especially towards the end), a bit long sometimes, a bit lonely too, but above all beautiful. Breathtaking landscapes, the sea, the mountains, the climbs (Jay feels he can climb the Everest now, I’m trying to convince him to start with the Pyrenees), the wind, Pasteis de Nata, tapas, restaurants, bars, encounters, and hours of pedaling and enjoying. I’m turning a page, we’ll rather go east from now on, but it’s certainly one of the beautiful pages of this trip, full of memories, images, smells, moments, nothings and everythings…

La Vuelta esta completa

At the departure of Santander, my GPS leads me on a « Carril Bici », a bicycle path, and I am so unused to find one that I follow it as long as possible, even if it means making a small detour. I have the opportunity to admire the airport of Santander from very close. Very enjoyable. Then I reach the coast, and a very nice beach in Langre. It is at this moment that the rain (which was threatening since the departure) starts to fall. A nice big rain that soaks, with just enough wind for it to get in my eyes… Perfect. I give up my beach explorations and I ride on the road while waiting for the rain to calm down. This eventually happens towards Isla Playa, where I find another nice beach…

Langre
Isla Playa

The rest of the road to Bilbao is an alternation of ascents and descents, showers and « dry » periods (but no sun either, don’t ask for too much), nice little towns, industrial areas and long stretches of road along fields.

On the road to Bilbao
Another beach

Bilbao offers itself to me under the rain, for a change… Fortunately, the hostel is very nice, and I even have the pleasure to meet another cyclist there, who rides in the other direction, and with whom we spend the evening exchanging on our respective experiences, walking in town and drinking beers until the end of the night…

The night falls on Bilbao
The Zubizuri bridge

The next day, after a champion’s breakfast, I set out towards the Basque coast. In order not to arrive too fast in San Sebastian, I cut directly to the coast, which makes me take the least flat road out of Bilbao. I get pitying looks from all the people I meet and I’m soaked after 5 minutes, but at least I don’t suffer from the cold! And the sun is there so I’m not going to complain about it. I join the coast in Lekeitio, which turns out to be an excellent idea: a nice town, a nice beach, and a great road along the sea where I meet more pedestrians than cars. And at each turn, it offers me an impressive view of the cliffs that go down to the sea. A treat

Lekeitio and its beach
The sea
The best will manage to distinguish Biarritz
The beach of Getaria

I ride along a river and end up in San Sebastian (which according to some sources would be the cleanest city in Europe… There are still empty cans lying around on the beach, like everywhere unfortunately…). For once, I don’t have to complain about the entrance into the city: bike lanes everywhere (and even a bike tunnel!) and drivers who really pay attention to bikes, it’s like being back in Germany… I have time to eat a huge pizza and to have a digestive walk at night before the curfew…

Arrival in San Sebastian
The sun sets

The next day, last day in Spain, I have the pleasure to ride about 30 kilometers on a Via Verde going to Pamplona. A lot of cyclists and walkers at the beginning (May 1st effect I guess), but soon I have the track, the forest and the river all to myself. Once again it doesn’t rain, it’s not too hot either, the conditions are ideal. I also go through many tunnels, some lit (a little) and some not. When the tunnel makes a bend, I have a little shiver when I am completely in the dark, but each time the light comes back quickly. I think I’ve seen everything about tunnels when I find myself with: 1. 650m of unlit tunnel. Even though it’s straight, I very quickly can’t see the bike anymore (and I’m sitting on it and still have my hands on the handlebars). The concept of « light at the end of the tunnel » makes sense. I’m glad that some little joker didn’t put a hole or a rock in my way and I’m happy to get out in one piece. 2. A 4.5 kilometer tunnel. In a semi-light, it seems very long and it’s not very reassuring…

The Via Verde
The light at the end of the tunnel

Just before arriving in Pamplona, I realize that my phone charger is not working anymore. I have 30% of battery left. It’s Sunday. Everything is closed. Annoying. No battery means no GPS, no camera, no way to contact people. Rather complicated. I ride around town but I’m a little too preoccupied with this phone thing so I eat a quick snack and get back on the road. I’ve looked at the route on my phone beforehand, I’ve noted the cities I’m supposed to go through and once I’m sure I’m on the right road I turn off the phone. I feel a bit naked. And I thought I had done a good job on this cell phone addiction…

Leitza, nestled in its valley
Pamplona

I climb in the Pyrenees, under the sun. A first pass, the Erro pass (Erro also happens to be a village, a river and a valley…), then a descent in the eponymous valley and we go up again. Second pass, second descent, towards Roncesvalles this time. There is a monument commemorating the legend of Rolland and a church but that is about all there is to see. The road continues to climb and I am not sure when I will reach the top of the pass. It’s getting late and cold. I see a kind of bunker on the side of the road, but there is water at the bottom. Too bad. 500m farther, I am at the top of the pass of Ibañeta. Easy not to have GPS in fact. And there is a small path on the side which leads to a corner of flat grass. Really too easy…

The next day, the tent is covered with frost and it’s cold. But I still have all the winter gear. Clever! The descent is pleasant, I even have the luxury to catch up with a truck (which distances me again as soon as the road is flat, but well, that was expected). Then I cross the border. Once again, no sign, no customs officer or barrier… Thanks Schengen! I realize that I am in France because the N-135 became the D933 and because cars are passing by closer and faster. Nice. I stop in the first supermarket I find to buy an IGN map of the region. In the old fashioned way, I get ready to join Pau by following the map and road signs! A little old man comes to see me coming out of the supermarket, I’m happy to be able to have a fluent conversation with a « local »: “Hello – Hello Mister – Do you have the right to circulate? – Well, I take it – Ah, that’s good.” He leaves. I don’t know if I should laugh or cry. Apparently the only thing that counts when you meet a traveler is to know if he has the right to travel… The rest of the trip is uneventful, the descent of the Osquish pass offers me a superb view of the snowy summits of the Pyrenees. All this under a radiant sun. A small sandwich bought in the first bakery I encounter makes a quite acceptable lunch break. I also pass by the town of Navarrenx. Very nice from the outside but completely empty once I passed its gates… Arrived in Pau, before going to meet Marie and Florent, I find a store where I can get a new phone cable. The phone still works. Phew. It was funny with the map but I didn

Una Vuelta de Iberica…

Jour 290, Pau, 17.066 km

Et voilà. Avec cette nouvelle escale à Pau chez Marie et Florent, j’ai complété mon tour de la péninsule ibérique. Ce fut montagneux (beaucoup), pluvieux (surtout vers la fin), un peu long parfois, un peu solitaire aussi, mais avant tout magnifique. Des paysages à couper le souffle, la mer, la montagne, du dénivelé (Jay se sent capable de monter l’Everest maintenant, j’essaie de le convaincre de commencer par les Pyrénées), du vent, des Pasteis de Nata, des tapas, des restos, des bars, des rencontres, et des heures à pédaler et à profiter. C’est une page qui se tourne, on va plutôt aller vers l’Est à partir de maintenant, mais c’est certainement une des belles pages de ce voyage, bien remplie de souvenirs, d’images, d’odeurs, d’instants, de tout et de rien…

La Vuelta esta completa

Au départ de Santander, mon GPS me mène sur une « Carril Bici », une piste cyclable, et je n’ai tellement pas l’habitude d’en trouver que je la suis le plus longtemps possible, quitte à faire un petit détour. J’ai l’occasion d’admirer l’aéroport de Santander de très près en prime. On se régale. Je rejoins ensuite la côte, et une très jolie plage à Langre. C’est à ce moment-là que la pluie (qui me pendait au nez depuis le départ) se met à tomber. Une bonne grosse pluie qui trempe, avec juste assez de vent pour qu’elle m’arrive dans les yeux… Parfait. J’abandonne mes explorations de plages et je trace sur la route en attendant que ça se calme. Ce qui finit par arriver vers Isla Playa, où je trouve une autre jolie plage…

Langre
Isla Playa

Le reste de la route jusqu’à Bilbao est une alternance de montées et de descentes, d’averses et de périodes de « sec » (mais pas de soleil non plus, faut pas trop en demander), de jolies petites villes, de zones industrielles et de longues portions de route en bordure de champs.

Sur la route de Bilbao
Encore une plage

Bilbao s’offre à moi sous la pluie, pour changer… Heureusement, l’auberge de jeunesse est très sympa, et j’ai même le plaisir d’y retrouver un autre cycliste, qui fait la route dans l’autre sens, et avec qui on passe la soirée à échanger sur nos expériences respectives, à se promener en ville et à boire des coups jusqu’au bout de la nuit…

La nuit tombe sur Bilbao
Le pont Zubizuri

Le lendemain, après un petit-déjeuner de champion, je me lance à l’assaut de la côte basque. Pour ne pas arriver trop vite à San Sebastian, je coupe directement vers la côte, ce qui me fait prendre la route la moins plate qui sort de Bilbao. J’ai des regards de pitié de tous les gens que je croise et je suis en nage au bout de 5 minutes, mais au moins je ne souffre pas du froid ! Et le soleil est de la partie donc je ne vais pas m’en plaindre. Je rejoins la côte à Lekeitio, ce qui s’avère être une excellente idée : une jolie ville, une jolie plage, et une super route en bord de mer où je croise plus de piétons que de voitures. Et qui à chaque virage m’offre une vue impressionnante sur les falaises qui se jettent dans la mer. Un régal

Lekeitio et sa plage
La mer
Les meilleurs arriveront à distinguer Biarritz
La plage de Getaria

Je longe un fleuve pour finir par arriver à San Sebastian (qui selon certaines sources serait la ville la plus propre d’Europe… Il y a quand même des cannettes vides qui trainent sur le bord de la plage, comme un peu partout malheureusement…). Pour une fois, je n’ai pas à me plaindre de l’entrée dans la ville : des pistes cyclables partout (et même un tunnel cyclable !) et des automobilistes qui font vraiment attention aux vélos, on se croirait de retour en Allemagne… J’ai le temps de déguster une énorme pizza et de m’offrir une promenade digestive à la nuit tombante avant l’heure du couvre-feu…

Arrivée à San Sebastian
Le soleil se couche

Le lendemain, dernier jour en Espagne, j’ai le plaisir de faire une trentaine de kilomètres sur une voie verte en allant vers Pampelune. Beaucoup de cyclistes et de promeneurs au départ (effet 1er mai j’imagine), mais rapidement j’ai la piste, la forêt et la rivière pour moi tout seul. Encore une fois il ne pleut pas, il ne fait pas non plus trop chaud, les conditions sont idéales. Je traverse aussi beaucoup de tunnels, certains éclairés (un peu) et d’autres pas. Quand le tunnel fait un coude, j’ai un petit frisson au moment où je suis complètement dans le noir, mais à chaque fois la lumière revient assez vite. Je crois avoir tout vu en matière de tunnels quand je me retrouve coup sur coup avec : 1. Un tunnel non éclairé de 650m. Il a beau être tout droit, je ne vois très rapidement plus le vélo (alors que je suis assis dessus et que j’ai toujours les mains sur le guidon). Le concept de « lumière au bout du tunnel » prend tout son sens. Je suis content qu’un petit plaisantin n’ait pas mis un trou ou un caillou sur mon chemin et ravi d’en sortir entier. 2. Un tunnel de 4,5 kilomètres. Dans un semi éclairage, ça parait très long et c’est pas très rassurant…

La Via Verde
La lumière au bout du tunnel

Juste avant d’arriver À Pampelune, je me rends compte que mon chargeur de téléphone ne fonctionne plus. Il me reste 30% de batterie. On est dimanche. Tout est fermé. Ennuyeux. Qui dit plus de batterie dit plus de GPS, plus d’appareil photo, plus de moyen de contacter des gens. Dit compliqué. Je fais un tour de la ville mais je suis un peu trop préoccupé par cette histoire de téléphone donc j’avale un rapide casse-croûte et je me remets en route. J’ai pris soin de regarder l’itinéraire sur mon téléphone au préalable, j’ai noté les villes par lesquelles je suis censé passer et une fois que je suis sûr d’être sur la bonne route j’éteins le téléphone. Je me sens un peu tout nu. Et dire que je pensais avoir bien travaillé sur cette addiction au portable…

Leitza, nichée dans sa vallée
Pampelune

Je monte dans les Pyrénées, sous le soleil. Un premier col, le col d’Erro (Erro s’avère également être un village, une rivière et une vallée…), puis une descente dans la vallée éponyme et on remonte. Deuxième col, deuxième descente, vers Roncevaux cette fois. Il y a un monument qui commémore la légende de Rolland et une église mais c’est à peu près tout ce qu’il y a à voir. La route continue à monter et je ne sais pas trop quand je vais arriver au sommet du col. Il commence à se faire tard et à faire froid. J’avise une sorte de bunker sur le côté de la route, mais il y a de l’eau qui stagne au fond. Tant pis on continue. 500m plus loin, je suis au sommet du col d’Ibañeta. Facile de ne pas avoir de GPS en fait. Et il y a un petit chemin sur le côté qui mène à un coin d’herbe plat. Vraiment trop facile…

Le lendemain, la tente est couverte de givre et il fait froid. Mais j’ai encore tout l’équipement d’hiver. Malin ! La descente est agréable, je m’offre même le luxe de rattraper un camion (qui me distance à nouveau dès que la route est plate, mais bon, on pouvait s’y attendre). Je passe ensuite la frontière. Encore une fois pas de panneau, de douanier ou de barrière… Merci Schengen ! Je me rends compte que je suis en France parce que la N-135 est devenue la D933 et que les voitures qui me doublent passent plus près et plus vite… Super. Je m’arrête dans le premier supermarché que je trouve pour m’acheter une carte IGN de la région. À l’ancienne, je me prépare à rejoindre Pau en suivant carte et panneaux ! Un petit vieux vient me voir en sortant du supermarché, je me réjouis de pouvoir avoir une conversation fluide avec un « local » : « Bonjour – Bonjour Monsieur – Vous avez le droit de circuler ? – Ben, je le prends – Ah c’est bien ». Il s’en va. Je ne sais pas si je dois rire ou pleurer. Apparemment la seule chose qui compte lorsqu’on croise un voyageur c’est de savoir s’il a le droit de circuler…

Le reste du trajet est sans histoires, la descente du col d’Osquish m’offre une superbe vue sur les sommets enneigés des Pyrénées. Le tout sous un soleil radieux. Un petit sandwich acheté dans la première boulangerie que je croise fait une pause déjeuner tout à fait acceptable. Je passe aussi par la ville de Navarrenx. Très jolie de l’extérieur mais complètement vide une fois passées ses portes… Arrivé à Pau, avant d’aller retrouver Marie et Florent, je trouve un magasin où me procurer un nouveau câble de chargeur. Le téléphone fonctionne toujours. Ouf. C’était marrant avec la carte mais je ne me voyais pas faire le reste du voyage comme ça…

Rain and Fog

Day 286, Santander, 16.515 km

While talking with the hostel manager before leaving Oviedo (in Spanish please!), I tell her about my intention to go to the Picos de Europa park. She has a little grin, as if to say, “Well, that guy must not have looked at the weather forecast” and says, “I hope you won’t have snow”. I, with brimming confidence, answer, “No, no, I checked, the temperatures won’t go below 8°”. As I’m saying goodbye, she gives me her card and says, “If there is anything, call me, I will do my best to help you”. I’m starting to wonder if I’m not a bit reckless on this one… In the end, I escaped the snow, but not the fog, nor the rain, nor the cold, and this in spite of my competition socks and my luxury gloves. I climbed 3 passes above 1.200m and each time it was the same: fog before, after and during the climb, rain soaking on the way up and freezing wind on the way down. Was it worth it? Yes, a thousand times yes. However, I’ll have to come back to see the part above 1.000m because everything looked like this:

As for the passes, if you have seen one, you have seen them all…

One pass…
… looks exactly…
… like the other.

But let’s get back to our story, or rather to Oviedo. I take leave of my host who seems to be worried about me. But the beginning of the stage proves her wrong: the road goes down, I have a light breeze which pushes me nicely, I cross and recross the Rio Viao, everything is fine! The only little hitch is that I find that my tea has a strange taste. Maybe a bag a little old that I took at the hostel in the morning. I taste it again. I understand. The guy salted his tea. That’s worth a Cooking Nobel Prize! Jay and Bob are laughing… As I arrive in Cangas de Onìs, it starts to rain, and I have a feeling of déjà vu: a nice little town surrounded by mountains, but because of the bad weather it looks just like a sad little town… It reminds me of Interlaken, in Switzerland. The next day I found myself under the snow… Let’s hope that the déjà vu stops in the valley…

Cangas de Onìs
There is not enough rain, it is necessary to turn on the fountains..

I start on the road to the Picos de Europa Park. One of the advantages of the overcast weather is that I do not see too far, and therefore I do not think too much about the size of the mountains that I’ll have to climb. They suddenly come out of the clouds, and then leave just as fast as I go around them. I now follow the Rio Sella, and the road starts to climb slowly.

Stairs on the Rio
The sides of the mountains become more and more vertical

Then I see a sign that says: « desfiladero de Los Beyos ». And it’s from this moment that I forget that it’s raining, that I’m cold, hungry, that my legs hurt or anything else than this landscape that unfolds before my eyes. The sides of the montains are getting tighter, steeper and higher. My neck hurts from having my head raised to the sky. Each turn reveals a new series of sharp peaks that tower over me from all their height, while I pass, tiny, a few hundred meters below. And this goes on for kilometers. Kilometers, speechless, stopping every 100 m to take a picture, repeating again and again: “it’s magnificent”. In the evening, looking at the pictures, I am a little disappointed. I don’t know if it’s the rain or just the bad photographer in me, but I don’t find the overwhelming majesty of these gorges on the pictures… I select the best ones, but you will have to go there in person to fully appreciate…

Then I start the ascent of the first of the three passes, the last big piece of my day. It’s still as beautiful, a little more “open” but still as imposing. And I can see the cloud line getting closer and closer. Then I’m in the middle of it. Moreover my lights don’t work anymore, I take out the yellow jacket and cross my fingers so that the cars potentially passing by don’t arrive too fast. The end of the climb goes well, and it’s when I start to go down that it becomes a bit worrying: slippery road, 3 m of visibility, tight curves, a good slope, fortunately I have good brakes. And I quickly get out of the clouds. The road is moreover almost all straight while arriving at Posada de Valdeón.

We get closer to the clouds
The arrival to Posada de Valdeón

I find myself at a crossroads: Either I take the left, I continue to descend towards the village of Cain, where I think I can find a small place to sleep. But everything meter downhill today has to be climbed back up first thing in the morning tomorrow. Either I take a right, and head for the park exit. Heads or tails. Since I passed through a village called Les Faces (Heads in French) in the morning, I take a left (those who didn’t find the link don’t ask me questions, I’m looking for it too…). And when I start to go downhill, when my brakes start to whistle, to heat up, when it even starts to smell burnt, I wonder if it was really a good idea… But the views that are offered to me quickly convince me of the contrary, and the village of Cain itself, with its 4 houses in its steep valley, at the end of the world, offers me a perfect refuge for a well-deserved night of rest.

The next day, the climb is as expected: horrible. And this time I see the signs: 20%. 13%. Then 20% again. The cars that overtake me are in first gear and you can hear that even with an engine the climb is hard. And the rain which starts to fall after 10 minutes does not arrange the things. But as always, we finally arrive there. Posada de Valdeón again and we continue to climb. As the day before, the top of the mountains is in the clouds, and quickly me too. In the rain and the cold. I pass some points of non-view (I imagine that without the fog it must be worth it, but now…). The descent is quick this time, and I find myself in a green valley, without rain, almost dry even!

I cross a nice village and start the last ascent: the San Glorio pass (the Google description says « 1.609 m high pass between Cantabria and Castilla y León with wide views on the mountain peaks ». See photo above for the wide views. Very funny…). I see out of the corner of my eye a sign on my right and I think I read « Zona de Baños ». Baths Zone? I look into the distance and see that the clouds seem to be moving very fast. But are they really clouds? Could it be steam escaping from a hot spring? I start to fantasize, a hot bath now. The dream. I press the pedals harder and harder. This is going to be great. No sun maybe but a hot spring. After 2 kilometers I have to face reality: it was just a cloud. So instead of a hot bath, I get a cold rain and a little breeze sticking my soaked clothes to my body. Not quite the same thing… I climb, I climb. And I’m cold. Despite my super gloves and my even more super socks. Indeed, water is wet, and even Jean-Michel Merinos’ high-tech socks, when they are wet, they don’t keep my feet warm… At the top of the pass, I take the time to admire the non-view on the surrounding summits and I start the descent. This one is endless. I am cold, so I pedal to warm up. But the road is slippery and the turns are tight so I brake. But I’m cold so I pedal. But I’m going too fast so I brake. And it goes on for a long, long time. When I finally get out of the clouds, I have a beautiful view on the valley and I tell myself for the thousandth time that I will have to come back to see all this under a beautiful sun…

Finally out of the clouds!

To finish, I have to go through the gorges of La Hermida. Magic. Even if with the rain and the wind, I sometimes lose the magic side of it. But a small cave on the road allows me to take a break sheltered from the rain and the wind, to enjoy the end of my tea (not salted this time) still hot and to leave the Park whole and in a good mood.

After a short break in a café in Unquera, I go to San Vicente de la Barquera where I think I can find a small piece of forest for the night. I have nice views over the city, but the forest I spotted after this one turns out to be closer to the public toilets than to the wild camper’s dream place, so I continue. I help a German to unload a door off his truck (he didn’t want to explain me what he was going to do with it…) and he shows me a small gravel path that goes down to the beach. Good choice! But the rain that starts to fall again prevents me from enjoying the view during the meal…

San Vicente de la Barquera
Nice view from the window of my room…

The next day, I don’t have any answer from the hostel to whom I asked if it was possible to arrive before the time indicated on the website (i.e. 5 pm). So I make turns and detours, I take my time as rarely to not arrive too quickly. But under the rain, this strategy has its limits. So I end up taking refuge in a restaurant in Santander. On the terrace though, we are not allowed to eat inside. But the rain calmed down and a good hot soup puts me back in good spirits! Enough to take advantage of the remaining daylight after the shower to go to walk in town and to take advantage even of one of the numerous open terraces to get a cold beer!

View on the Magdalena Palace
The Plaza Porticada

Pluie et Brouillard

Jour 286, Santander, 16.515 km

En discutant avec la gérante de l’auberge de jeunesse avant de partir d’Oviedo (en espagnol s’il vous plait !), je lui fais part de mon intention d’aller dans le parc des Picos de Europa. Elle a un petit rictus, l’air de dire, « Oulah, il n’a pas du bien regarder les prévisions météo celui-là » et me lance « J’espère que tu n’auras pas de neige ». Moi, confiant, de répondre, « Non, non, j’ai vérifié, les températures ne descendent pas au-dessous de 8° ». Au moment de me dire au revoir, elle me donne sa carte en me disant « Si jamais il y a quoi que ce soit, appelle-moi, je ferai de mon mieux pour t’aider ». Je commence à me demander si je ne suis pas un peu téméraire sur ce coup-là… Au final, j’ai échappé à la neige, mais pas au bouillard, ni à la pluie, ni au froid, et ce malgré mes chaussettes de compétition et mes gants de luxe. J’ai passé 3 cols au-dessus de 1.200m et à chaque fois c’était la même chose : brouillard avant, après et pendant, pluie qui trempe dans la montée et vent glacial dans la descente. Est-ce que ça en valait la peine ? Oui, mille fois oui. En revanche il faudra que je repasse pour revoir la portion au-dessus de 1.000m parce que tout ressemblait à ça :

Quant aux passages de col, si vous en avez vu un, vous les avez tous vus…

Les cols…
… se suivent…
… et se ressemblent.

Mais revenons à nos moutons, ou plutôt à Oviedo. Je prends donc congé de mon hôte qui semble se faire du souci pour moi. Mais le début de l’étape lui donne plutôt tort : la route descend, j’ai une légère brise qui me pousse gentiment, je croise et recroise le Rio Viao, tout va bien ! Seul petit hic, je trouve que mon thé a un goût bizarre. Peut-être un sachet un peu vieux que j’ai pris à l’auberge le matin. Je regoûte. Je comprends. Le type a salé son thé. Ça vaut bien un prix Nobel de cuisine ça ! Jay et Bob se marrent… Au moment où j’arrive à Cangas de Onìs, la pluie se met à tomber, et j’ai une sensation de déjà vu : une jolie petite ville entourée de montagnes, mais à cause du temps pourri ça donne une petite ville un peu triste… Ça me rappelle Interlaken, en Suisse. Le lendemain je m’étais retrouvé sous la neige… Espérons que le déjà vu s’arrête dans la vallée…

Cangas de Onìs
Il n’y a pas assez de la pluie il faut en plus allumer les fontaines…

Je me lance sur la route du parc Picos de Europa. Un des avantages du temps couvert c’est que je ne vois pas trop loin, et donc je ne cogite pas trop sur la taille des montagnes à escalader. Celles-ci sortent soudainement des nuages, puis repartent aussi vite à mesure que je les contourne. Je longe maintenant le Rio Sella, et la route commence tranquillement à monter.

Des escaliers sur le Rio
Les parois se font de plus en plus verticales

Je vois ensuite un panneau qui m’indique : « desfiladero de Los Beyos ». Et c’est à partir de ce moment-là que j’oublie qu’il pleut, que j’ai froid, faim, mal aux jambes ou quoi que ce soit d’autre que ce paysage qui se déroule devant mes yeux. Les parois se resserrent, montent à pic et de plus en plus haut. J’ai la nuque douloureuse à force d’avoir la tête levée au ciel. Chaque virage me révèle une nouvelle série de pics acérés qui me toisent de toute leur hauteur, alors que je passe, minuscule, quelques centaines de mètres plus bas. Et ça dure pendant des kilomètres. Des kilomètres, bouche bée, à m’arrêter tous les 100 m pour faire une photo, à répéter encore et encore : « c’est magnifique ». Le soir en regardant les photos, je suis un peu déçu. Je ne sais pas si c’est la pluie ou simplement moi qui suit mauvais photographe mais je ne retrouve pas l’écrasante majesté de ces gorges sur les images… Je vous sélectionne tout de même les meilleures, mais il faudra vous rendre sur place pour apprécier pleinement…

Puis je commence l’ascension du premier des trois cols, dernier gros morceau de ma journée. C’est toujours aussi magnifique, un peu plus « aéré » mais toujours aussi imposant. Et je vois la limite des nuages qui se rapproche petit à petit. Puis je suis en plein dedans. En plus mes lumières ne fonctionnent plus, je sors le gilet jaune et croise les doigts pour que les éventuelles voitures n’arrivent pas trop vite. La fin de la montée se passe bien, et c’est au moment de commencer à descendre que ça devient un peu inquiétant : route glissante, 3 m de visibilité, des lacets bien serrés, une bonne pente, heureusement que j’ai de bons freins. Et que je ressors rapidement des nuages. La route est en plus quasiment toute droite en arrivant à Posada de Valdeón.

On se rapproche des nuages
L’arrivée à Posada de Valdeón

Je me trouve à une croisée des chemins : Soit je prends à gauche, je continue à descendre vers le village de Cain, où je pense pouvoir trouver un petit coin pour dormir. Mais tout ce que je descends aujourd’hui doit être remonté le lendemain matin à la première heure. Soit je prends à droite, et je me dirige vers la sortie du parc. Pile ou Face. Etant donné que je suis passé par un village qui s’appelle Les Faces le matin, je prends à gauche (que ceux qui n’ont pas trouvé le rapport ne me posent pas de questions, je le cherche aussi…). Et quand je commence à descendre, que mes freins se mettent à siffler, à chauffer, que ça se met même à sentir le brûlé, je me demande si c’était vraiment une bonne idée… Mais les vues qui s’offrent à moi ont vite fait de me convaincre du contraire, et le village de Cain lui-même, avec ses 4 maisons dans sa vallée encaissée, au bout du monde, m’offre un parfait refuge pour une nuit de repos bien méritée.

Le lendemain, la montée est comme attendue : horrible. En plus cette fois je vois les panneaux : 20%. 13%. Puis 20% à nouveau. Les voitures qui me doublent sont en première et on entend au bruit que même avec un moteur la montée est dure. Et la pluie qui se met à tomber au bout de 10 minutes n’arrange pas les choses. Mais comme toujours, on finit par y arriver. Posada de Valdeón à nouveau et on continue à monter. Comme la veille, le sommet des montagnes est dans les nuages, et du coup rapidement moi aussi. Dans la pluie et le froid. Je passe quelques points de non-vue (j’imagine que sans le brouillard ça doit valoir le coup, mais là…). La descente est rapide cette fois, et je me retrouve dans une vallée bien verte, sans pluie, quasiment sec même !

Je traverse un joli village et me lance dans la dernière ascension : le col de San Glorio (la description de Google dit « Col de 1.609 m d’altitude entre Cantabrie et Castille-et-León offrant de larges vues sur les sommets des montagnes ». Cf photo en début de page pour les larges vues. On rigole…). Je vois du coin de l’œil un panneau sur ma droite et j’ai l’impression de lire « Zona de Baños ». Zone de bains ? Je regarde un peu au loin et je vois que les nuages semblent se déplacer bien vite. Mais sont-ce bien des nuages ? Ne serait-ce pas de la vapeur d’eau qui s’échappe d’une source chaude ? Je me mets à fantasmer, un bain chaud maintenant. Le rêve. J’appuie de plus en plus fort sur les pédales. Ça va être génial. Pas de soleil peut-être mais une source chaude. Au bout de 2 kilomètres je dois me rendre à l’évidence : c’était juste un nuage. Du coup en lieu et place d’un bain chaud j’ai une pluie glaciale couplée à une petite brise qui me colle mes habits trempés au corps. Pas tout à fait le même délire… Je monte, je monte. Et j’ai froid. Malgré mes super gants et mes chaussettes encore plus super. En effet, l’eau mouille, et même les chaussettes high-tech de Jean-Michel Merinos, quand elles sont mouillées, elles ne tiennent pas bien chaud… En haut du col, je prends bien le temps d’admirer la non-vue sur les sommets environnants et je repars dans la descente. Celle-ci est interminable. J’ai froid, donc je pédale pour me réchauffer. Mais la route est glissante et les virages serrés donc je freine. Mais j’ai froid donc je pédale. Mais je vais trop vite donc je freine. Et ça dure longtemps, longtemps. Quand je sors enfin des nuages, j’ai une belle vue sur la vallée et je me dis pour la millième fois qu’il me faudra revenir pour voir tout ça avec un beau soleil…

Enfin sortis des nuages !

Pour finir, j’ai encore le droit à un nouveau défilé, celui de La Hermida. Magique. Même si avec la pluie et le vent de face, je perds parfois le côté magique de vue. Mais une petite grotte sur la route me permet de faire une pause à l’abri de la pluie et du vent, de déguster la fin de mon thé (non-salé cette fois) encore chaud et de sortir entier et de bonne humeur du défilé.

Après une petite pause dans un café à Unquera, je rejoins San Vicente de la Barquera où je pense pouvoir trouver un petit bout de forêt pour la nuit. J’ai de jolies vues sur la ville, mais la forêt que j’ai repérée après celle-ci se révèle plus près des toilettes publiques que de l’endroit rêvé du campeur sauvage, donc je continue. J’aide un allemand à décharger une porte de son camion (il n’a pas voulu m’expliquer vraiment ce qu’il comptait en faire…) et il m’indique un petit chemin de graviers qui descend vers la plage. Bonne pioche ! Mais la pluie qui recommence à tomber m’empêche de profiter de la vue pendant le repas…

San Vicente de la Barquera
Jolie vue depuis la fenêtre de ma chambre…

Le lendemain, je n’ai pas de réponse de l’auberge de jeunesse à qui j’ai demandé s’il était possible d’arriver avant l’heure indiquée sur le site (à savoir 17h). Je fais donc des tours et détours, je prends mon temps comme rarement pour ne pas arriver trop vite. Mais sous la pluie, cette stratégie a des limites. Je finis donc par aller me réfugier dans un restaurant à Santander. En terrasse par contre, on n’a pas le droit de manger à l’intérieur. Mais la pluie s’est calmée et une bonne soupe chaude me remettent d’aplomb ! De quoi profiter du temps de jour qui me reste après la douche pour aller me promener en ville et profiter même d’une des nombreuses terrasses ouvertes pour me rafraîchir le gosier !

Vue sur le palais de la Magdalena
La Plaza Porticada

Get ready for the worst and survive the least…

Day 283, Oviedo, 16.170 km

I was promised hell: thunderstorms, wind, and especially a lot of rain. In the end, I rode through the drops, I was sometimes faster than the rain, or just got lucky, I don’t know, in any case it seems that a good angel is watching over me these days…

In the morning, I take a little tour of Santiago, have a brunch to have something in my stomach for the day, and then set off. To answer some reactions to the last article, Santiago, like Dresden or Bratislava before it, decided to renovate one of its monuments, in this case the cathedral, at the time of my visit, as if to show me only a part of its charms. On the other hand, it was still possible to go for a walk in the cathedral and to admire the famous censer, which was unfortunately not moving…

It’s time to leave. The weather is stormy, and the sky is quite gray. The road goes up, for a change, and is far from being spectacular: as at the arrival the day before, gas stations, dealerships or industrial areas follow one another. Then I am a little more in the countryside, but we remain on a rather monotonous road: fields, forests, forests then fields. I make two photos in the day, two rivers which come to break a little the monotony of the landscape. Rivers which are very similar to each other by the way. About rain? Only a few drops that shorten one of my breaks. I decide to stop in a field for the night, and as I finish putting up the tent, the storm breaks. Clutch.

River n°1
Same same, but different (as my Indians friends often say)

The thunder is loud during the night, it even falls quite close to me once or twice but it doesn’t prevent me from sleeping like a log. The next day, it doesn’t rain anymore when I get up but I get a big shower a few minutes after the start: I have to admit that it’s not ideal for warm up… The road goes up a bit more, but I quickly find myself in a nice descent, with the sun coming out from behind the clouds. The road is quite flat, it’s good after the big hills of the last days. I decide to make a small detour to get closer to the sea, to try to see some beaches, and I’m glad I did! I follow the coast for about ten kilometers and my eyes are full of it…

I follow the national road again for a few kilometers, then again the beach, the cliffs, the rocks, the sea. All this always under the sun, with some clouds in the sky which seem to be pushed away from the sea, far from my road… I enjoy it! I cross the pretty town of Luarca, which reminds me a bit of Karlovy Vary in the Czech Republic, and I start to take the small mountain road that should bring me to the place I’ve found to stop tonight. It goes through the forest, passes and passes again under the highway, in small villages, in sight of the sea or a little more inland, under a very grey sky but still no rain. I arrive at the Playa del Silencio (a very poetic name), magnificent, and I spot a small hut below which will provide me with a perfect shelter against the wind. Unluckily, this hut seems to be someone’s bachelor pad, this someone being in the process of repainting his roof (he probably is a hussar, this boy…). Missed. Fortunately, there is a small flat piece of land a little higher on the cliff: best bivouac spot in the world, mark my words!

Luarca
Playa del Silencio
The hussar on the roof…
The Spot

As the day before, the rain starts to fall when I am under the tent. I look at the weather forecast to try to reassure me for the next day: failed, they announce rain all day. Great. I just have to sleep and hope… It rains all night long, but again no more in the morning when in wake up… What more to ask for! The day is again under the sun, few adventures, except when the national road I am following turns into a highway, or when I am so absorbed by my GPS that I crash into a car in Oviedo. Result: a bag to throw away and a good fright but otherwise everything is fine!

Cudillero
The countryside before arriving in Oviedo

I have time to have a little tour of Oviedo between the raindrops and the glasses of cider, and I find statues everywhere, it must be an electoral campaign topic for the mayors of Oviedo: to the one who will add the most statues! On that note, see you later!

Woody Allen
Mafalda
La Maternidad, by Botero
The Regent

Qui se prépare au pire supporte le moins…

Jour 283, Oviedo, 16.170 km

L’enfer m’était promis : des orages, du vent, et surtout beaucoup de pluie. Au final, je suis passé à travers les gouttes, j’ai parfois pris la pluie de vitesse, ou juste eu de la chance, je ne sais pas, en tout cas il semblerait qu’une bonne étoile veille sur moi ces derniers temps…

Le matin, je fais un petit tour de Compostelle, déguste un brunch pour avoir quelque chose dans le ventre pour la journée, puis me mets tranquillement en route. Pour répondre à certaines réactions au dernier article, Compostelle, comme Dresde ou Bratislava avant elle, a décidé de rénover un de ses monuments, dans ce cas la cathédrale, au moment de mon passage, comme pour ne me montrer qu’une partie de ses charmes. En revanche, il était tout de même possible de faire un tour dans la cathédrale et d’admirer le fameux encensoir, immobile malheureusement…

C’est l’heure du départ. Le temps est à l’orage, et le ciel est bien gris. La route monte, pour changer, et est loin d’être spectaculaire : comme à l’arrivée la veille, stations-service, concessionnaires ou encore zones industrielles se succèdent. Puis je me trouve un peu plus dans la campagne, mais on reste sur une route de type plutôt non-changeant: champs, forêts, forêts puis champs. Je fais deux photos dans la journée, deux rivières qui viennent rompre un peu la monotonie du paysage. Rivières qui se ressemblent fortement au demeurant. De pluie peu de traces, seulement quelques gouttes qui écourtent une de mes pauses. Je décide de m’arrêter dans un champ pour la nuit, et au moment où je finis de monter la tente, l’orage éclate. Clutch.

Rivière n°1
Same same, but different (comme disent souvent mes amis indiens)

Ça tonne fort pendant la nuit, ça tombe même assez près une ou deux fois mais ça ne m’empêche pas de dormir comme un loir. Le lendemain, il ne pleut plus quand je me lève mais je me prends une grosse averse quelques minutes après le départ : je dois avouer que c’est pas idéal pour l’échauffement… La route monte encore un peu, mais je me retrouve assez rapidement dans une belle descente, avec le soleil qui commence à sortir de derrière ses nuages. La route est bien plate en plus, ça fait du bien après les gros dénivelés des derniers jours. Je décide de faire un petit détour pour me rapprocher de la mer, essayer d’apercevoir quelques plages, grand bien m’en prend ! Je suis la côte pendant une dizaine de kilomètres et je m’en mets plein les yeux…

Je retrouve la nationale pendant quelques kilomètres, puis à nouveau la plage, les falaises, les rochers, la mer. Tout ça toujours sous le soleil, avec quelques nuages dans le ciel qui semblent repoussés loin de la mer, loin de ma route… j’en profite ! Je traverse la jolie ville de Luarca, qui me rappelle un peu Karlovy Vary en République tchèque, et me lance à l’assaut de la petite route de montagne qui doit m’amener à l’endroit que j’ai repéré pour m’arrêter cette nuit. Ça louvoie dans la forêt, ça passe et repasse sous l’autoroute, dans des petits villages, en vue de la mer ou un peu plus dans les terres, sous un ciel bien gris mais toujours pas de pluie. J’arrive à la Playa del Silencio (très poétique comme nom), magnifique, et je repère une petite cahute en contrebas qui me fera un abi parfait contre le vent. Manque de pot, cette cahute semble être la garçonnière de quelqu’un, ce quelqu’un étant justement en train de repeindre son toit (il doit probablement être hussard ce garçon…). Raté. Heureusement, il y a un petit bout de terrain plat un peu plus haut sur la falaise : meilleur spot de bivouac du monde, et je pèse mes mots !

Luarca
la Playa del Silencio
Le hussard sur le toit…
The Spot

Comme la veille, la pluie se met à tomber au moment où je suis à l’abri. Je regarde la météo pour essayer de me rassurer pour le lendemain : raté, ils annoncent de la pluie toute la journée. Génial. Il ne me reste plus qu’à dormir et espérer… Il pleut toute la nuit, mais encore une fois pas le matin quand je me réveille… Que demande le peuple ! La journée se passe encore une fois sous le soleil, peu de péripéties, sauf quand la nationale que je suis se transforme en autoroute, ou que je suis tellement absorbé par mon GPS que je rentre dans une voiture à Oviedo. Bilan : une sacoche à jeter et une bonne frayeur mais sinon tout va bien !

Cudillero
La campagne avant d’arriver à Oviedo

J’ai le temps de faire un petit tour d’Oviedo entre les gouttes de pluie et les verres de cidre, et je trouve des statues un peu partout, ça doit être un sujet de campagne électorale pour les maires d’Oviedo : à qui ajoutera le plus de statues ! Sur ce, à plus !

Woody Allen
Mafalda
La Maternidad, de Botero
La Régente

The Camino de Santiago

Day 280, Santiago de Compostella, 15.819 km

Like many things since the beginning of this trip, I had been told about it, but apparently hearing and feeling are not the same thing. « Santiago de Compostela, you’ll see, you need to climb it ». « The north of Spain, you don’t stop going up and down”. I have to admit, once again, that I didn’t choose the easiest way (at the same time I wouldn’t have left Hamburg if I had followed the easy way), but still: on average over the last 3 days: 138 km / 2. 534 m of ascent per day (the time is long gone when exceeding 2.500 m of ascent in one day was considered as a feat… and at that time I was « only » doing 100 km in one day… we’ll say that training pays off!). Indeed I confirm, you need to have good legs to go to Santiago…

Let’s meet where I left you last time: I’m sipping a glass of port, in Porto, to digest the gargantuan brunch I just ate. The weather is a bit cloudy, and I hurry to do the 2-3 errands I need to do before the rain breaks. Ready for the departure, I just have to enjoy a good night sleep before the next day. The weather is grey. I keep my fingers crossed that it will last as long as possible. The beginning of the ride is quite monotonous: I go from one village to another, without even a forest to break the continuity of car dealerships, supermarkets and industrial areas. I’m a little bit above the Douro valley, but apart from some houses and a few rows of vineyards here and there, there’s not much to admire… I arrive in Amarante, and the road starts to go down (or rather up) a little bit more in the nature, in the forest. Nice. On the other hand, this is the moment where raindrops start to fall… Less nice…

The Douro valley
Fortunately there are bus stops to take shelter during the breaks…

The advantage with the rain is that it refreshes you a bit during the climbs. And we’re not talking about a horizontal downpour that makes you feel like you have to lift mountains every time you pedal, but a light rain, not too violent… but I’m still wet… Anyhow, I’m still in a good mood, or at least in a good enough mood to admire the view during the climb. The colors come out differently, the top of the mountain is often in the clouds, it is difficult to evaluate the distances, but the bottom of the valley invaded by clouds is worth a look…

I finally arrive in Vila Real. The Lonely Planet sold me the highest wine region in Portugal. I may have the highest rainfall in Portugal, but I don’t feel like going for a walk in the vineyards… I take a little tour of the city center, but I quickly get tired of the cobblestones (a custom in Portugal apparently, for any medium-sized city, the city center has to be entirely cobblestoned…) and I start looking for a café for a little break. After 2 coffees, 2 sandwiches and 4 Pasteis de Nata, I’m still wet and the idea to stop in a hostel for the night crosses my mind. But it doesn’t last, and I quickly have a much better idea: to warm up, there is nothing like a little climb. And it’s a good thing, to get out of Vila Real, I have to go through a pass at 1.000 m. Andale!

Vila Real seen from above

The rain calms down on the last kilometers of the climb, I even have the impression to dry and I find a small corner of nice forest to spend the night. Just before the next rain shower… The next day, everything is soaked, especially the shoes that it is very unpleasant to put back on, but it is not raining. A fog covers everything and hides the road after a few meters. Not ideal for the descent. At a sharp bend in the road, I see a little late the car coming in front of me. None of us is going fast, the probabilities of collision are close to zero, but I brake anyway. Bad idea. The road is soaked, slippery, my rear wheel skids and I end up on the ground. Clever. Fortunately, more fear than harm, I can leave with a good fracture of my self-esteem but nothing more serious. Then I find a bike path (it must be the second one I find in Portugal…) that takes me through the vineyards, that goes up a little and down a lot, in short I enjoy it. 

The road in the fog
The vineyards without the rain this time

Against the advice of my GPS, I decide to follow the departmental road. Good idea! A nice artificial lake is waiting for me at the bend with a long descent towards Viera do Minho. With a few more degrees I would have gone for a swim. Viera do Minho, my last stop on Portuguese soil. For good measure, I order 4 Pasteis de Nata at the local pastry shop, then 2 more (I’m told that the ones from Lidl in Spain are not bad, I’ll have to test them…). Then I go against the GPS again (we will not have been very much in agreement during this day), and it is still a very good idea. The views on the valley of Cávado are simply grandiose. With the sun rising as a bonus. Fairy-like…

Mountain lake…
The valley of the Cávado

Then begins the ascent towards the Spanish border. The road winds in the forest, in the shade of the trees, with from time to time a view on the valley. The trees are gigantic, the rock formations too, and I feel very small in the middle of all these giants. The sun is beating down, but there is a water source to drink from almost every kilometer, and even some impressive waterfalls.

I wonder what is waiting for me at the border, as usual I start to think, to repeat in my head the story I will be able to tell to the customs officers. I come across some cars that have passed me a little earlier and are coming back down. I start to wonder. And when I reach the top, the border is indeed closed…

Ha Ha Ha

It is written that I will not have any problems at the borders. I lose one hour and I start a superb descent. Spain knows how to welcome ! I meet a German cyclist who makes the road in the other direction, we discuss a little and I set off again. There is a bit of wind, it’s still climbing (not too much but enough to feel it) and the day starts to be a bit long. I find a small flat spot just after a last big climb, perfect to bivouac.

The sun rises

I start by going downhill the next day, but as I will soon realize, « Every descent to Santiago must be climbed again ». Moreover the sky decided to play with my nerves. It’s raining. I put on pants, overshoes and close the jacket. I start to feel hot. So hot that I wonder if I’m wet from the rain or from sweat. It stops raining. I force myself to wait a bit before taking it all off, you never know. Finally I am too hot, I remove the rain gear. Guess what, it starts raining again. Too bad, all this will dry tonight… Last big climb before the finish, I get ready to push on the pedals for 20 km. After 10 km, it goes down again… « Nice to see these climbs going down, I think to myself ». Except that every descent must be climbed again… Ha Ha. The end of the stage reminds me of the departure from Porto. City, city then city. Gas station, car dealer, supermarket. In short, I arrive in Santiago…

I find cyclists in my room when I arrive, they go to Portugal, so we spend the evening together, get some drinks and eat a huge burger. I even discuss with a German who is travelling on foot, and meet a girl whom I had already met in Seville 3 weeks ago… Long live the travels!

The cathedral of Santiago under construction… coincidence, I don’t think so

Le chemin de Compostelle

Jour 280, Saint Jacques de Compostelle, 15.819 km

Comme beaucoup de choses depuis le début de ce voyage, on m’en avait parlé, mais apparemment, entendre et ressentir, ce n’est pas la même chose. « Compostelle, tu verras, ça grimpe ». « Le nord de l’Espagne, c’est des plateaux, t’arrêtes pas de monter et de descendre ». Alors je dois reconnaitre, encore une fois, que je n’ai pas choisi la voie la plus facile (en même temps je ne serais pas parti d’Hambourg si j’avais suivi la solution de facilité), mais tout de même : en moyenne sur les 3 derniers jours : 138 km / 2.534 m de dénivelé par jour (il est loin le temps ou le fait de dépasser les 2.500 m de dénivelé sur une journée passait pour un exploit… et à l’époque je ne faisais « que » 100 km sur la journée… on dira que l’entrainement porte ses fruits !). Donc je confirme, il faut avoir les jambes pour monter à Compostelle…

Retrouvons-nous là où je vous ai laissés la dernière fois : je suis en train de siroter un verre de Porto, à Porto, pour digérer le brunch gargantuesque que je viens d’avaler. Le temps est un peu couvert, et je me dépêche de faire les 2-3 courses qui me manquent avant que l’averse n’éclate. Fin prêt pour le départ, il ne me reste qu’à profiter d’une bonne nuit de sommeil avant le lendemain. Le temps est au gris. Je croise les doigts pour que ça tienne le plus longtemps possible. Le début de l’étape est assez monotone : je passe de village en village, sans même une forêt pour briser la continuité des concessionnaires auto, supermarchés et autres zones industrielles. Je suis un peu en surplomb de la vallée du Douro, mais à part des maisons et quelques rangs de vignes de ci de là, il n’y a pas grand-chose à admirer… J’arrive à Amarante, et la route commence à s’enfoncer (ou plutôt à s’élever) un peu plus dans la nature, dans la forêt. Chouette. En revanche c’est le moment que choisit la pluie pour se mettre à tomber… Moins chouette…

La vallée du Douro
Heureusement qu’il y a des abribus pour s’abriter pendant les pauses…

L’avantage avec la pluie, c’est que ça rafraichit un peu pendant les montées. Et puis on ne parle pas d’une pluie battante à l’horizontale qui donne l’impression de devoir soulever des montagnes à chaque coup de pédale, mais d’une petite pluie fine, pas trop violente… mais qui mouille quand même… Donc je suis encore de bonne humeur, du moins d’assez bonne humeur pour admirer la vue pendant la montée. Les couleurs ressortent différemment, le sommet de la montagne est souvent dans les nuages, il est difficile d’évaluer les distances, mais le fond de la vallée envahi de volutes de nuages vaut le coup d’œil…

Je finis par arriver à Vila Real. Le Lonely Planet m’a vendu la région viticole la plus haute du Portugal. J’ai peut-être la pluie la plus haute du Portugal, mais en tout cas pas l’envie d’aller me promener dans les vignes… Je fais un petit tour du centre-ville, mais j’en ai vite marre des pavés (une coutume au Portugal apparemment, pour toute ville de taille moyenne, le centre-ville doit être intégralement pavé…) et je me mets en quête d’un café pour une petite pause. Après 2 cafés, 2 sandwich et 4 Pasteis de Nata, je suis toujours mouillé et l’idée de m’arrêter dans une auberge pour la nuit me traverse l’esprit. Mais ça ne dure pas, et j’ai très vite une bien meilleure idée : pour se réchauffer, rien de tel qu’une petite montée. Et ça tombe bien, pour sortir de Vila Real, je dois passer un col à 1.000 m. Andale !

Vila Real vue d’en haut

La pluie se calme sur les derniers kilomètres de montée, j’ai même l’impression de sécher et je me trouve un petit coin de forêt sympa pour passer la nuit. Juste avant l’averse suivante… Le lendemain, tout est trempé, notamment les chaussures qu’il est très désagréable de remettre au pieds, mais il ne pleut pas. Un brouillard couvre tout et masque la route au bout de quelques mètres. Pas idéal pour la descente. Au détour d’un virage un peu serré, je vois un peu tard la voiture qui arrive en face. Ni elle ni moi n’allons très vite, les probabilités de collision sont proches du néant, mais je donne un gros coup de frein quand même. Mauvaise idée. La route est trempée, glissante, ma roue arrière dérape et je me retrouve par terre. Malin. Heureusement plus de peur que de mal, je peux repartir avec une bonne fracture de l’amour propre mais rien de plus grave. Je trouve ensuite une voie verte (ça doit être la deuxième que je trouve au Portugal…) qui m’emmène dans les vignes, qui monte un peu et descend beaucoup, en bref je me régale.  

La route dans le brouillard
Les vignes sans la pluie cette fois

Contre l’avis de mon GPS, je décide de suivre la départementale. Bonne idée ! Un joli lac artificiel m’attend au détour d’un virage avec une longue descente vers Viera do Minho. Avec quelques degrés de plus je serais allé me baigner. Viera do Minho, ma dernière halte en terre portugaise. Pour faire bonne mesure, je commande directement 4 Pasteis de Nata à la pâtisserie du coin, puis 2 de rab (on me dit dans l’oreillette que celles du Lidl en Espagne ne sont pas mauvaises, il va me falloir aller tester…). Puis je coinche le GPS à nouveau (on n’aura pas été très d’accord pendant cette journée), et c’est encore une très bonne idée. Les vues sur la vallée du Cávado sont tout simplement grandioses. Avec le soleil qui se lève en prime. Féerique…

Lac de montagne…
La vallée du Cávado

Puis commence la montée vers la frontière espagnole. La route serpente dans la forêt, à l’ombre des arbres, avec de temps en temps un point de vue sur la vallée. Les arbres sont gigantesques, les formations rocheuses aussi, et je me sens tout petit au milieu de tous ces géants. Le soleil tape, mais il y a de quoi boire quasiment tous les kilomètres, et même des cascades assez impressionnantes.

Je me demande ce qui m’attend à la frontière, comme d’habitude je commence à me faire des films, à répéter dans ma tête l’histoire que je vais pouvoir raconter aux douaniers. Je croise des voitures qui m’ont doublé un peu auparavant qui redescendent. Je commence à me poser des questions. Et quand j’arrive au sommet, la frontière est effectivement fermée…

Ha Ha Ha

Décidément, il est écrit que je n’aurai pas de problèmes aux frontières. Je perds une heure et je me lance dans une superbe descente. L’Espagne sait accueillir !! Je croise un cycliste allemand qui fait la route dans l’autre sens, on discute un peu et je me remets en route. Il y a un peu de vent, ça grimpe toujours autant (pas trop mais suffisamment pour le sentir) et la journée commence à être un peu longue. Je me trouve un petit coin plat juste après une dernière grosse montée, parfait pour bivouaquer.

Le soleil se lève

Je commence par descendre le lendemain, mais comme je vais assez vite m’en rendre compte, « Toute descente vers Compostelle se remonte un jour ». En plus le ciel a décidé de jouer avec mes nerfs. Il pleut. Je mets pantalon, sur-chaussures et ferme la veste. Je commence à avoir chaud. Tellement chaud que je me demande si je suis mouillé à cause de la pluie ou de la transpiration. Il s’arrête de pleuvoir. Je me force à attendre un peu avant d’enlever le tout, on ne sait jamais. Finalement j’ai trop chaud, je retire la tenue de pluie. Comme par hasard il se remet à pleuvoir. Tant pis, tout ça sèchera ce soir… Dernière grosse montée avant l’arrivée, je me prépare à pousser sur les pédales pendant 20 km. Au bout de 10, ça redescend. « Sympa ces montées qui descendent, me dis-je ». Sauf que toute descente se remonte… Ha Ha. La fin de l’étape me fait penser au départ de Porto. Ville puis ville puis ville. Station-service, concessionnaire, supermarché. Bref, j’arrive à Compostelle…

Je trouve des cyclistes dans ma chambre en arrivant, ils vont vers le Portugal, du coup on en profite pour passer la soirée ensemble, boire quelques coups et manger un énorme burger. Je discute même avec un allemand qui se déplace à pieds lui, et croise une fille que j’avais déjà croisé à Séville il y a 3 semaines… Vive les voyages !!

La cathédrale de Compostelle en travaux… coïncidence, je ne crois pas…