Capri, c’est fini (and Italy too…)

Day 372, Trieste, 25.346 km

For the soundtrack, it’s here

Turning another page… After a month and a half of avoiding crazy drivers on the roads, surviving hell-like heat, enduring the two rainy days of summer and tasting as many pizzas as possible (and admitting that they were all better than each other), I only have a few kilometers of Italy left before the Balkans… By the way, the linguistic transition is « made easier » for me since the signs are written in two languages: I’m already able to ask for the direction to Trieste (you never know, if I feel like turning around) or to the communal soccer field (even if I’m not sure I can pronounce the word correctly…). It’s still a bit early to look back, but I’d say I ate well, got a nice tan and will have something to dream about for a few more years…

When I leave Faenza, I am pleasantly surprised to notice that the road I am following is lined with a bicycle path. A real one, separated from the cars by a small embankment, paved and clean. I’m a bit wary, my previous experiences have shown that sometimes the end can be quite abrupt. But not this time. At least not right away. When the bike path goes towards the Po delta, I hesitate. Then I tell myself that bird songs instead of car noises could be nice. 500 meters further, private road, locked gate. Too bad, it will be cars… Ferrara and its impressive walls pass by, then I ride along the Po, again on a bike path. It reminds me of the Elbe, the Danube or the Rhine: I’m high on a dike, flanked on one side by the river and on the other by fields. Pleasant most of the time, a little less with the wind…

The Po…
… and the fields

Unfortunately, the Po goes eastwards and I go north, so I quickly have to go back to the road, its cars and trucks. But with the wind at my back it goes a bit faster and I quickly arrive in Padova. Very nice city, nice colored houses, many crowded terraces and a superb square that reminds me a bit of the Plaza de España in Sevilla, the Prato della Valle, with its many statues surrounding a small circular canal. At the exit of the city, the road goes along a canal, and I seem to see a bike path on the other side of it (incredible, I see more bike paths in one day than all the other days I spent in Italy combined). Suspicious, I stay on the road for a while, but after about 15 km I finally have to admit that this time it’s for real! And when the track forks towards Treviso, in the forest, and I even find water fountains every ten kilometers, I tell myself that I am living the dream. And the small grove of hazel trees that hides me for the night only reinforces this impression. Which is quickly contradicted by the return in force of mosquitoes and a slug-attack…

Padua, the Prato della Valle and the Basilica of Saint Anthony
Padua, a mosaic of colors

The next day, Treviso. I stroll a little in the city, following at random the cyclists I meet. Very nice and very paved. When I realize that I’m going in circles, I treat myself a coffee, a croissant, and I go back to the road towards the Dolomites. Cycle path (again) to get out of the city, and along the road to Conegliano, where I chat in 4 languages with an old man who used to be an ice dealer in Canada, a pizzaiolo in Germany, who gabbles a bit of English that I spice up with Italian words: great literature! Then the number of cars decreases drastically and the first foothills of the Dolomites appear: it’s going to get spicy!

Treviso
First view of the Dolomites

I start with a series of tunnels. One of which is 4 kilometers long, not the best cycling experience of the day: each car that passes me makes the noise of a freight train launched at the speed of a high speed train, I let you imagine the effect of buses or heavy trucks. But once back in the open air, it’s a real treat: an artificial lake with turquoise waters flanked by mountains, themselves crowned with clouds. And it lasts for a few kilometers, while the announced climb is not so bad. The road is almost deserted, I must have found one of the only itineraries that tourists and bikers don’t know… The lake becomes a river, a tiny blue strip on its white pebble bed, while each turn reveals a new peak, a new mountain with pine trees. After the pass of San Osvaldo, I even have the leisure to let myself go in the descent and to gorge myself with these grandiose images…

Then Longarone, an industrial area that seems huge to me after having passed only tiny villages for several hours, a road under construction and hundreds of trucks… But a sign « cycle route » comes to my rescue, it’s definitely good to cycle in the north! However, I understand the word « Chiusa » in Italian, and when it is added to the word « road », it’s usually not a good sign… I stop the first bike I see and ask if the road is open. The thumbs up indicates that the road is free, even if the lady who informs me adds an eloquent gesture: it will climb hard! Indeed, for the end of the day, it’s a little bit sportive, but some nice little villages decorate the slope, a small local supermarket provides for my food needs and the proximity of a chalet offers me a flat ground sheltered from the wind… A couple of old people pass by me as I finish my dessert, and in a hesitant English ask me if I’m going to sleep here (which I confirm), if I want to sleep in the chalet (which I decline), and where I come from. I realize when they leave that they were probably the owners of the chalet, and therefore of the land, and that I didn’t even think of asking them if they were okay with me invading their turf. If my mother knew what I did with my manners, she would probably already be busy looking for a new son to adopt…

The next day, overcast. I cross my fingers that it doesn’t rain. At least not on me. And without warming up, I start climbing the mountains: slopes with more than 10% declivity and laces which make me dizzy. I am overtaken by an Italian cyclist and his supporters car, then by a group of Swiss who have a supporters van, a film crew equipped with the latest cell phones and who shout encouragement in Swiss-German: big atmosphere on the slopes of the Sella di Razzo! Still some clouds that blur the view at the top, but the sun comes out timidly and warms me up a bit before the magnificent descent on the mountainside to Sauris and its lake…

I hesitate to climb the Pura pass, but choose for once the easy way and the descent in superb gorges towards Ampezzo. The only drawback: more tunnels, paved and slippery this time. And not that much light to add to the fun… But no fall, I arrive in Ampezzo in one piece and start the last difficulty in the Dolomites: the Rest pass. It’s short, hard, but once I arrive at the top I tell myself that the view was worth it. And that even if it wasn’t, I would climb all the passes in the world just for the pleasure of the descent! Not a single pedal stroke and an average speed of more than 40 km/h, the mountains as impressive as ever, a waterfall and at the bottom a new lake where the surrounding peaks are reflected. Then the Tagliamento river which makes its way among the pebbles… A dream!

After a quick tour in Udine, I find a field shortly after the exit of the city which seems to be suitable for camping. A bit close to the railroad, but I tell myself that the trains will not run all night. No way! I’m awake every hour or so, and moreover there seems to be a nightclub in the area I even have music! But well, the sun that rises in the morning and the perspective of sleeping in a bed that night help to swallow the pill… And the road leads me quite quickly to the sea again, with a pleasantly lazy descent to Trieste, where I’m going to spend a well-deserved weekend of rest…

No beach, no problem!
The amphitheater
Sunset on the canal

And from Sunday on, it’s goodbye Italy and hello Croatia!

I know, I went a bit out of the map…

Capri, c’est fini (et l’Italie aussi…)

Jour 372, Trieste, 25.346 km

Pour la BO, c’est par ici

Encore une page qui se tourne… Après un mois et demi à éviter les conducteurs fous sur les routes, à survivre à des chaleurs dignes des feux de l’enfer, à subir les deux jours de pluie de l’été et à goûter le plus de pizzas possible (et admettre qu’elles étaient toutes meilleures les unes que les autres), je n’ai plus que quelques kilomètres d’Italie avant les Balkans… D’ailleurs, on me « facilite » la transition linguistique puisque les panneaux sont écrits en deux langues : je suis déjà capable de demander la direction de Trieste (on sait jamais, si j’ai envie de faire demi-tour) ou du terrain de foot communal (même si je ne suis pas certain d’arriver à prononcer correctement le mot…). Il est encore un peu tôt pour faire un bilan, mais je dirais que j’ai bien mangé, bien bronzé et que j’aurais de quoi rêver pour encore quelques années…

Quand je pars de Faenza, je suis assez agréablement surpris de noter que la route que je suis est bordée d’une piste cyclable. Une vraie en plus, séparée des voitures par un petit talus, goudronnée, propre. Je suis un peu méfiant, mes expériences précédentes ont montré que parfois, la fin pouvait être assez abrupte. Mais pas cette fois. Du moins pas tout de suite. Quand la piste cyclable part vers le delta du Po, j’hésite. Puis je me dis que des chants d’oiseaux plutôt que des bruits de voiture ça peut être sympa. 500 mètres plus loin, chemin privé, barrière cadenassée. Tant pis, ce sera les voitures… Ferrara et son impressionnant mur d’enceinte passe, puis je longe le Po, à nouveau sur une piste cyclable. Ça me rappelle l’Elbe, le Danube ou encore le Rhin : je trône sur une digue, flanqué d’un côté par le fleuve et de l’autre par des champs. Agréable la plupart du temps, un peu moins avec le vent…

Le Po…
… et les champs

Malheureusement, le Po va globalement vers l’est et je me dirige vers le nord, donc je retrouve assez rapidement la route, ses voitures et ses camions. Mais avec le vent dans le dos ça va un peu plus vite et j’arrive rapidement à Padoue. Très jolie ville, de jolies maisons colorées, beaucoup de terrasses noires de monde et une superbe place qui me rappelle un peu la Plaza de España de Séville, la Prato della Valle, avec ses nombreuses statues qui entourent un petit canal circulaire. A la sortie de la ville, la route longe un canal, et il me semble apercevoir une piste cyclable sur l’autre rive de ce dernier (incroyable, je vois plus de pistes cyclables en une journée que tous les autres jours passés en Italie réunis). Méfiant, je reste un moment sur la route, mais au bout d’une quinzaine de kilomètres je finis par me rendre à l’évidence : cette fois c’est pour de bon ! Et quand la piste bifurque vers Trévise, dans la forêt, et qu’il y a même des points d’eau tous les dix kilomètres, je me dis que je vis un rêve éveillé. Et le petit bosquet de noisetiers qui me cache pour la nuit ne fait que renforcer cette impression. Finalement rapidement démentie par le retour en force des moustiques et une attaque de limaces…

Padoue, le Prato della Valle et la Basilique de Saint-Antoine
Padoue, une mosaïque de couleurs

Le lendemain, Trévise. Je flâne un peu en ville en suivant au hasard des cyclistes que je croise. Très joli et très pavé. Puis quand je me rends compte que je tourne en rond, je m’offre un café, un croissant, et je repars vers les Dolomites. Piste cyclable (encore) pour sortir de la ville, et le long de la route jusqu’à Conegliano, où je discute en 4 langues avec un vieux monsieur qui a été vendeur de glaces au Canada, pizzaiolo en Allemagne, qui baragouine un peu d’anglais que je pimente de mots italiens : de la grande littérature ! Le nombre de voitures diminue ensuite drastiquement et les premiers contreforts des Dolomites apparaissent : ça va chauffer !

Trévise
Premier aperçu des Dolomites

On commence d’abord par un enchainement de tunnels. Dont un de 4 kilomètres de long, pas la meilleure expérience cycliste de la journée : chaque voiture qui me dépasse fait le bruit d’un train de marchandises lancé à la vitesse d’un TGV, je vous laisse imaginer l’effet des bus ou autres poids lourds. Mais une fois de nouveau à l’air libre, c’est un vrai régal : un lac artificiel aux eaux turquoises flanqué de montagnes, elles-mêmes couronnées de nuages. Et ça dure pendant un petit moment, alors que la montée annoncée n’est finalement pas si terrible. La route est quasiment déserte, j’ai dû trouver un des seuls itinéraires que les touristes et les motards ne connaissent pas… Le lac devient rivière, minuscule bande bleue sur son lit de galets blancs, alors que chaque virage révèle un nouveau pic, une nouvelle montagne piquetée de pins. Passé le col de San Osvaldo, j’ai même le loisir de me laisser glisser dans la descente et de me gorger de ces images grandioses…

Longarone ensuite, bassin industriel qui me paraît énorme après n’avoir croisé que de minuscules villages pendant plusieurs heures, une route en travaux et des camions par centaines… Mais un panneau « itinéraire cyclable » vient à ma rescousse, il fait décidément bon faire du vélo dans le nord ! En revanche, le comprends le mot « Chiusa » en italien, et quand il est accolé au mot route, ce n’est généralement pas bon signe… J’arrête le premier vélo que je croise et demande si la route est ouverte. Le pouce levé m’indique que la voie est libre, même si la dame qui me renseigne ajoute un geste éloquent : ça va monter ! Effectivement, pour une fin de journée, c’est un peu sportif, mais de jolis petits villages agrémentent la pente, une petite superette locale subvient à mes besoins alimentaires et la proximité d’un chalet m’offre un terrain plat et abrité du vent… Un couple de petits vieux passe à côté de moi alors que je finis mon dessert, et dans un anglais hésitant me demande si je vais dormir ici (ce que je confirme), si je veux dormir dans le chalet (ce que je décline), et d’où je viens. Je réalise quand ils sont partis qu’ils étaient probablement les propriétaires du chalet, donc du terrain, et que je n’ai même pas pensé à leur demander s’ils étaient d’accord pour que j’envahisse leur chez-eux. Si ma mère savait ce que j’ai fait de mes manières, elle serait probablement déjà occupée à chercher un nouveau fils à adopter…

Le lendemain, ciel couvert. Je croise les doigts pour qu’il ne pleuve pas. Du moins pas sur moi. Et sans échauffement, on s’attaque à la montagne : des pentes à plus de 10% et des lacets qui donnent le tournis. Je me fais doubler par un cycliste italien et sa voiture de supportrices, puis par un groupe de suisses qui ont carrément un Van de soutien, équipe de tournage munie des derniers téléphones portables et qui hurle des encouragements en suisse-allemand : grosse ambiance sur les pentes de la Sella di Razzo ! Toujours quelques nuages qui brouillent un peu la vue en haut, mais le soleil sort timidement le bout de son nez et me réchauffe un peu avant la descente magnifique à flanc de montagne vers Sauris et son lac…

J’hésite ensuite à monter le col de Pura, mais choisis pour une fois la voie de la facilité et la descente dans de superbes gorges vers Ampezzo. Seul bémol : encore des tunnels, pavés et glissants cette fois. Peu éclairés aussi, histoire d’en rajouter un peu… Mais pas de chute, j’arrive entier à Ampezzo et me lance dans la dernière difficulté prévue dans les Dolomites : le col de Rest. C’est court, dur, mais une fois arrivé en haut je me dis que la vue en valait la peine. Et que même si ce n’était pas le cas, rien que pour le régal de la descente je remonterai tous les cols du monde ! Pas un coup de pédale et une moyenne à plus de 40 km/h, les montagnes toujours aussi impressionnantes, une cascade et en bas un nouveau lac où les sommets avoisinants se reflètent. Puis le fleuve Tagliamento qui se fraye un chemin parmi les galets… Le rêve !

Après un rapide tour dans Udine, je me déniche un champ peu après la sortie de la ville qui me paraît propice. Un peu près de la voie ferrée, mais je me dis que les trains ne rouleront pas toute la nuit. Que nenni ! Je suis réveillé á peu près toutes les heures, et en plus il semble y avoir une boite de nuit dans le coin j’ai même de la musique ! Mais bon, le soleil qui se lève le matin et la perspective de dormir dans un lit le soir font passer la pilule… Et la route me mène assez rapidement à nouveau au bord de la mer, avec une descente agréablement paresseuse vers Trieste, où je vais passer un weekend de repos bien mérité…

Pas de plage, pas grave !
L’amphithéâtre
Coucher de soleil sur le canal

Et dès dimanche, c’est adieu l’Italie et bonjour la Croatie !

Oui je sais, je suis un peu sorti de la carte…

Anniversaire pluvieux, anniversaire heureux!

Jour 367, Faenza, 24.766 km

En cherchant un titre pour cet article, je me suis rendu compte que le thème de la pluie revenait souvent dans les choix que j’avais fait jusqu’à présent, donc la référence sera cette fois (très) discrète… Anniversaire donc ! Les plus perspicaces d’entre vous auront déjà remarqué que le compteur des jours a dépassé les 365… En effet cela fait exactement un an et deux jours que je suis parti d’Hambourg. Un an et deux jours que je me promène, au gré du vent, là où la route me mène, là où la famille et les amis m’appellent… C’est passé très vite, et en même temps il s’est passé tellement de choses qu’il y en aurait assez pour remplir dix années… Et Bob a un an aussi. Après avoir perdu sa voix au retour d’Espagne, il commence maintenant à avoir des cheveux blancs (j’imagine que pour un dino en plastique, une de nos années équivaut à 80 des siennes…). Et même si la référence est discrète, on va un peu parler de pluie aussi…

Au départ de Pescara, je tourne le dos à la mer et rentre dans les terres, direction le parc national du Gran Sasso. Le ciel est gris, j’ai vaguement regardé la météo la veille et il semble que des orages soient annoncés. Et ça ne rate pas. Je me suis tellement vanté de ne pas avoir vu un nuage depuis plus d’un mois, d’avoir laissé la pluie en haut de l’Izoard, de mes 30° de moyenne, ça devait bien finir par arriver. Et au départ je me réjouirais presque de cette petite averse. Elle ne dure pas, le soleil réapparait immédiatement et je suis sec vingt minutes plus tard. Moi qui avait fait de la pluie un fléau du cycliste, on peut dire que j’ai changé d’avis depuis… Du moins c’est ce que je crois… Et la première montée vers Brittoli, pas trop dure, est parfaite pour me mettre en jambes. Facile.

On commence ensuite les choses sérieuses, avec la montée vers Castel del Monte et le Vatico di Capo la Serra. Le ciel est couvert mais il ne pleut pas. En revanche j’entends l’orage qui gronde pas loin. Je me prends à espérer qu’il va rester de l’autre côté des montagnes, et que mon chemin va plutôt m’en éloigner… C’est beau l’espoir. Un peu avant le sommet, il commence à pleuvoir doucement, et comme il fait aussi un peu froid (je suis quasiment à 1.600m d’altitude), je sors tout mon équipement de pluie qui était en train de pourrir au fond de mes sacs. Les vues sur la vallée, sur le village de Castel del Monte et sur les montagnes alentours sont magnifiques, malgré la pluie qui forcit je me régale…

Castel del Monte
Il Monte Bolza
Tout en haut…

Dans la descente, j’essaie de regarder partout à la fois et d’imprimer tous ces paysages dans ma mémoire, du coup je ne suis pas à 100% concentré sur la route, je prends un virage un peu vite et je me retrouve par terre. Aie. Curieusement, aucune égratignure (je me rendrai compte en prenant une douche quelques jours plus tard que si, il y a tout de même eu égratignure, mais rien de dramatique), rien de cassé sur le vélo, je m’en sors pour une belle frayeur qui va me suivre dans toutes les descentes sur route mouillée qui viendront… Puis vient une superbe vallée, qui à l’exception de 3 camping-cars et de quelques troupeaux de moutons et de vaches est complètement déserte. La vue sur les montagnes, même si un peu cachée par les nuages et gâchée par la pluie semble assez incroyable…

Ça fait 2 heures que je suis sous la pluie, et comme les températures sont inférieures à 10° je commence à avoir du mal à me réchauffer. Je fais une petite pause sous l’auvent d’un refuge et me rends compte que le lac que je comptais atteindre le soir pour dormir est bien plus loin que ce que j’imaginais. Et la pluie qui ne veut pas s’arrêter… Tant pis, je reste là, l’auvent me permettra de faire sécher mes affaires et de repartir sec demain. Vœu pieu…

Le lendemain, je suis réveillé par le bruit de la pluie sur l’auvent. Ça fait envie… Coup de chance, le temps de prendre le petit-déjeuner et de faire les sacs, il ne pleut plus ! J’avais demandé un départ au sec, je suis servi ! Le ciel est couvert, le sommet des montagnes est mangé par les nuages, mais il ne pleut pas. Je m’offre une petite ascension vers le lac de Campotosto en guise de hors d’œuvre (heureusement que je ne me suis pas entêté hier, je ne serais jamais arrivé avant la nuit), décide d’en faire le tour puis me ravise en me rendant compte que la route que je voulais suivre ne fait quasiment que longer une centrale électrique. Bon choix !  

La pluie m’avait laissé presque tranquille depuis le matin, elle fait un retour en force et remarqué ! Des trombes d’eau commencent à s’abattre. Au départ ça ne me dérange pas trop, j’ai toujours l’espoir que ça ne dure pas, et puis je suis sur une portion de route plutôt en descente, j’avance bien, et je sais qu’une montée arrive bientôt pour me réchauffer. Je découvre aussi la joie des voitures qui me doublent d’un peu près quand la route est trempée : en plus de l’eau qui tombe du ciel, c’est comme si chaque conducteur me jetait un seau d’eau en passant. Très agréable. Et pas un seul qui ferait mine de ralentir ou de s’excuser. On s’amuse bien tous ensemble ! A partir d’Amatrice, je remarque des bâtiments en ruine le long de la route. Certains sont aussi renforcés par des poutres et des câbles. Après d’Arquata del Tronto, ce sont même parfois des villages entiers qui semblent détruits. Les résultats du tremblement de terre de 2016 sont encore bien visibles…

L’église de Piedilama

Je grimpe toujours. Sous la pluie. Je devine que le paysage doit être magnifique, mais je ne peux qu’entrevoir de vagues formes. C’est un peu comme regarder un spectacle comique dans une langue qu’on ne connait pas. On sait qu’il vient de se passer quelque chose de drôle, mais il manque l’essence de la blague. Et la pluie redouble d’intensité. Je tente de faire quelques photos, mais j’abandonne assez rapidement : en plus de ne pas arriver à faire fonctionner l’écran tactile, j’ai peur de complètement noyer mon téléphone. La route continue à monter. Il fait de plus en plus froid. Et je suis de plus en plus mouillé. Les motards qui passent dans l’autre sens me font des signes d’encouragement. Sympa. Et je me prends même à détester les gens qui me doublent, en short et t-shirts dans leurs voitures chauffées et sèches… Je sens que le paysage change, on dirait que les parois sont plus à pic, les gouffres plus profonds. J’essaie de prendre une photo mentale des paysages mais au moment où j’écris ces mots elle est déjà à moitié effacée… Et le vent commence à souffler. De face pour augmenter la force de la pluie. De côté pour me promener d’une extrémité à l’autre de la route. Et même pas une belle vue pour me dire que ça en vaut la peine.

En descendant dans la vallée, je suis content que le vent de face me ralentisse, j’ai encore un souvenir douloureux de ma chute de la veille. Je me dis qu’au prochain abri que je trouve, je m’arrête. Le prochain abri n’arrive pas avant 25 kilomètres. Ah Ah Ah. J’ai le temps de monter jusqu’au village de Castellucio, où toutes les places sous les auvents sont déjà prises, de redescendre dans la vallée, de grimper un nouveau col et de le redescendre. La descente se fait cette fois dans le brouillard, avec à peu près 33 cm de visibilité. Et la route détrempée en prime. Pas super. En bas de celle-ci, j’ai l’agréable surprise de trouver de l’eau, un toit, et même de sentir la pluie qui diminue. Le soleil me fait même une apparition, je commence à sécher et à me dire que si ça continue comme ça, la journée n’aura finalement pas été si terrible. Le temps de finir cette pensée, crac, énorme averse. Je suis à nouveau trempé en moins de temps qu’il ne faut pour l’écrire. Super. Je profite de l’accalmie suivante pour monter ma tente dans un champ (en pente) et me réfugier dans celle-ci…

La seule photo de l’après-midi

Le lendemain, c’est le bruit de la pluie sur le double toit qui me réveille. Je fais durer un maximum pour éviter de sortir, mais à un moment donné, il faut s’y filer… Je pars à 8h11. A 8h13 je suis trempé jusqu’aux os. Ça promet une belle journée d’anniversaire ! Petite pause ravitaillement à Matelica (je pense qu’un certain groupe de Metal a dû s’inspirer de ce village pour son nom…) et la pluie s’arrête. Je me méfie, on ne sait jamais ce que le ciel me réserve… Mais ça tient finalement, et j’enchaine montées et descentes, jolis petits villages perchés sur des collines, et belles vues sur les champs, les forêts et les montagnes…

Sassoferrato
Urbino

J’entame les dernières montées de la journée vers San Marin, avec toujours de superbes vues sur les environs. Un peu de vent de côté dans la descente, pas très rassurant quand on fonce à plus de 50 km/h, surtout quand il n’y a rien que des parois à pic à droite et à gauche de la route et pas de barrières… Je croise un autre cycliste, en vélo électrique, qui fait une partie de la montée finale avec moi. Même si le souffle court ne facilite pas la discussion, ça fait passer la partie la plus dure de l’escalade de manière agréable ! San Marin finit par arriver, un pays de plus à rajouter sur la liste ! Même s’il a été traversé en 33 minutes chrono…

Bienvenue sur la terre de la liberté, mais n’oubliez pas, vous êtes filmés !
Le Monte Titano

Courte étape pour finir le trajet vers Faenza, je commence par faire un détour par Rimini. Mauvaise idée. Le front de mer est tellement plein de parasols et de chaises longues qu’on ne voit ni le sable ni la mer. Tant pis. Je prends ensuite la Via Emilia qui doit m’amener à destination. Je suis les panneaux, tellement bien que je me retrouve sur l’autoroute. Encore. Et cette fois pas question d’y rester trop longtemps. Je prends la sortie qui doit me ramener sur la Via Emilia. Comme par magie, je suis sur l’autoroute qui va à Rome. Super. En travaux en plus, donc le camion derrière moi ne peut pas doubler, un embouteillage commence à se former. Et la sortie que je dois prendre est bloquée. Génial ! Je fais demi-tour à l’arrache (ne faites pas ça chez vous, c’est plutôt dangereux…) et finit par retrouver ma petite route, toute droite, qui va jusqu’à Faenza… A part ça, rien à signaler…

Rainy birthday, happy birthday!

Day 367, Faenza, 24.766 km

While looking for a title for this article, I realized that the theme of rain was often present in the choices I had made so far, so the reference will be (very) discreet this time… Anniversary then! The most perceptive among you will have already noticed that the day counter has exceeded 365… Indeed it’s been exactly one year and two days since I left Hamburg. One year and two days I’ve been wandering around, wherever the road takes me, wherever family and friends call me… It’s gone by so fast, and at the same time so much has happened that it would be enough to fill ten years… And Bob is a year old too. After losing his voice when we came back from Spain, he is now starting to have white hair (I guess for a plastic dino, one of our years is equivalent to 80 of his…). And even if the reference is discreet, we’re going to talk a little about rain too…

When I leave Pescara, I turn my back to the sea and go inland, towards the Gran Sasso national park. The sky is gray, I vaguely looked at the weather forecast the day before and it seems that thunderstorms are announced. And they do come as advertised. I bragged so much about not having seen a cloud for more than a month, about having left the rain at the top of the Izoard, about my 30° average temperature, it had to happen eventually. And at the beginning I am almost happy about this little shower. It doesn’t last, the sun reappears immediately and I am dry twenty minutes later. I had called rain a plague for cyclists, but I changed my mind since then… At least that’s what I think… And the first climb to Brittoli, not too steep, is perfect to get my legs ready. Easy.

We then begin the serious stuff, with the climb towards Castel del Monte and the Vatico di Capo la Serra. The sky is covered but it does not rain. On the other hand I hear the storm rumbling not too far away. I hope that it will stay on the other side of the mountains, and that my path will rather move away from it… Hope is beautiful. A little before the summit, it starts to rain gently, and as it is also a little cold (I am almost at 1.600m of altitude), I take out all my rain gear that was rotting at the bottom of my bags. The views of the valley, of the village of Castel del Monte and of the surrounding mountains are magnificent, and in spite of the rain I am enjoying it…

Castel del Monte
Il Monte Bolza
All the way up…

On the descent, I try to look everywhere at the same time and to fix all these landscapes in my memory, so I’m not 100% concentrated on the road. I take a turn a bit fast and I end up on the ground. Ouch. Strangely enough, no scratch (I will realize while taking a shower a few days later that yes, there was indeed a scratch, but nothing dramatic), nothing broken on the bike, I get out of it for a nice scare that will follow me in all the downhills on wet road that will come… Then comes a beautiful valley, which except for 3 campers and a few herds of sheep and cows is completely deserted. The view on the mountains, even if a little hidden by clouds and spoiled by the rain, seems quite incredible…

It’s been 2 hours since I’m under the rain, and as the temperature is below 10° I start to have difficulty to stay warm. I take a little break under the awning of a refuge and realize that the lake I was planning to reach in the evening to sleep is much further than I imagined. And the rain doesn’t seem to stop… Too bad, I stay there, the awning will allow me to dry my stuff and to leave tomorrow. Wishful thinking…

The next day, I am awakened by the noise of the rain on the awning. It makes me want to stay in the tent and go back to sleep… Luckily, by the time I have had breakfast and packed my bags, it is not raining anymore! I had asked for a dry start, I got it! The sky is covered, the top of the mountains is eaten by clouds, but it doesn’t rain. I start with a little climb to the lake of Campotosto as an appetizer (fortunately I didn’t get stubborn yesterday, I would never have arrived before night), decide to go around it and then change my mind when I realize that the road I wanted to follow is almost only along a power plant. Good choice! 

The rain had left me almost alone since the morning, it makes a return in force and noticed! Water showers are starting to fall. At the beginning it doesn’t bother me too much, I still hope it won’t last, and I’m also on a rather downhill section of road, I’m riding fast, and I know that a climb is coming soon to warm me up. I also discover the joy of the cars that overtake me when the road is soaked: in addition to the water that falls from the sky, it’s as if each driver throws me a bucket of water when passing. Very pleasant. And not a single one would pretend to slow down or apologize. We all have a good time together! From Amatrice, I notice ruined buildings along the road. Some are also reinforced by beams and cables. After Arquata del Tronto, they are even sometimes whole villages which seem destroyed. The results of the 2016 earthquake are still clearly visible…

The church of Piedilama

I am still climbing. Under the rain. I guess the landscape must be beautiful, but I can only catch vague glimpses of shapes. It is a little like watching a comic show in a language that one does not know. You know that something funny has just happened, but the essence of the joke is missing. And the rain redoubles of intensity. I try to make some photos, but I give up rather quickly: in addition to not being able to make the touch screen work, I am afraid to completely drown my phone. The road continues to climb. It’s getting colder and colder. And I’m getting wetter and wetter. Bikers passing in the other direction are waving at me. Nice. I somehow start to hate the people who pass me, in shorts and t-shirts in their heated and dry cars… I feel that the landscape is changing, it seems that the mountains are more steep, the chasms deeper. I try to take a mental picture of the landscape but as I write these words it is already half gone… And the wind starts to blow. From the front to increase the strength of the rain. Sideways to push me from one end of the road to the other. And not even a nice view to convince myself it’s worth it.

As I descend into the valley, I’m glad the headwind is slowing me down, I still have a painful memory of my fall the day before. I tell myself that at the next shelter I find, I stop. The next shelter does not arrive before 25 kilometers. Ah Ah Ah. I have time to go up to the village of Castellucio, where all the places under the awnings are already taken, to go back down to the valley, to climb a new pass and to go down again. The descent is this time in the fog, with about 33 cm of visibility. And the road is soaking wet. Not great. At the bottom of this one, I have the pleasant surprise to find water, a roof, and even to feel the rain decreasing. The sun even makes an appearance, I start to dry and to tell myself that if it goes on like this, the day will not have been so bad. The time to finish this thought, crack, huge shower. I’m soaked again in less time than it takes to write this. Great. I take advantage of the next lull to pitch my tent in a field (on a slope) and take refuge in it…

The only picture of the afternoon

The next day, it’s the sound of rain on the roof of my tent that wakes me up. I make it last as long as possible to avoid going out, but at some point, I have to go… I leave at 8:11. At 8:13 I am soaked to the bone. It will be a nice birthday! A short refreshment break in Matelica (I think that a certain metal band must have been inspired by this village for its name…) and the rain stops. I’m wary, you never know what the sky has in store for you… But it finally holds, and I ride up and down, pretty little villages perched on hills, and beautiful views on fields, forests and mountains…

Sassoferrato
Urbino

I start the last climbs of the day to San Marino, with great views on the surroundings. A little bit of side wind on the descent, not very reassuring when you go at more than 50 km/h, especially when there is nothing but steep walls on the right and left of the road and no barriers… I meet another cyclist, on an electric bike, who does part of the final climb with me. Even if the shortness of breath doesn’t make it easy to talk, it makes the hardest part of the climb go by in a pleasant way! San Marino finally arrives, one more country to add to the list! Even if it was crossed in 33 minutes…

Welcome to the land of freedom, but don’t forget, you are being filmed!
Monte Titano

Short stage to finish the journey to Faenza, I start by making a detour to Rimini. Bad idea. The seafront is so full of umbrellas and deckchairs that you can’t see the sand or the sea. Too bad. I then take the Via Emilia that should bring me to my destination. I follow the signs, so well that I end up on the highway. Again. And this time I don’t want to stay there too long. I take the exit that should bring me back to the Via Emilia. As if by magic, I’m on the highway to Rome. Great. It’s under construction, so the truck behind me can’t overtake, a traffic jam starts to form. And the exit I have to take is blocked. Great! I turn around in a hurry (don’t do that at home, it’s rather dangerous…) and end up back on my little road, straight ahead, that goes to Faenza… Apart from that, nothing to report…

Like Germans say, “Man trifft sich immer zweimal im Leben“

Day 363, Pescara, 24.261 km

After arriving in Bari, I struggle (a little) to climb the two floors that lead to the hostel while carrying bike and luggage. I hear the manager swearing « another huge bike! Well, I think, another cyclist is already there! Indeed, I quickly meet Florian, German living in Denmark, who left Greece a few days ago and rides back to Germany… We get along quickly and we decide to ride to Pescara together. Well almost, I want to go to the Gargano park, Florian prefers to cut inland. We will separate but we will meet again, it is anyway what the Germans say…

But before that, I had to reach Bari. And I won’t talk about hangover, we’ll just say that I’m not at 100% when I get up in the morning. Ah, the aftermath of the final… The preparations take a little longer than usual, it takes some time for my brain and my limbs to (re)find their synchronization, but I finally manage to get going in the middle of the morning. I soon find myself (and without really knowing it, my eyes too are obviously not completely coordinated with my brain) on the highway.  Considering my past experiences, I tell myself that this is not necessarily a bad thing. Then I quickly change my mind: this time, every second truck honks as it passes, every third car too, and there are so many people that I’m rarely passed with more than a meter of margin. Not so nice after all. Fortunately, a service road is calling me, and it has the good idea to follow the highway all the way to Bari. And it takes me through some nice towns on the coast: Brindisi, Monopoli (I sadly do not have my Monopoly with me) or Polignano a Mare. Always under a radiant sun, on flat ground and without wind…

Monopoli
Polignano a Mare

Before arriving in Bari, I notice the proliferation in the fields of what I take at first sight for some kind of bread oven. A little big, but maybe the local tradition wants the loaves to be the size of millstones… Or maybe the pizzas are all one meter in diameter… In short, nice ideas that go through my head… The truth is much more trivial, they are « trulli », dwellings of farm workers, houses after all… For big loaves of bread, we’ll pass.

The trulli by the sea

I arrive a little late in Bari, and especially very hungry, so I quickly look for something to eat… For the visit of the city, we’ll have to come back… The next day, after a breakfast and a provisioning at the supermarket, it’s a quartet which takes the exit of Bari, a quintet even counting Bob! Tailwind, a few clouds to prevent the temperature from rising too much, a not too busy and flat road, ideal conditions to discuss. A little less to take advantage of the landscape, but it’s a classic coast / beach with thousands of parasols / coastal city / seaside resort. And when it seems that it is going to change, that we are going to be on an narrow stretch of land with the sea on both sides, we are in fact going along salt marshes (of a not very pleasant pinkish color) and factories. It’s fortunate that we can discuss in the end!

Two bicycles…
… and two cyclists

A little before Manfredonia (I checked, all the inhabitants have Manfred as a middle name, since the foundation of the city by the King of Sicily Manfred the 1st), our paths separate for the first time: I set off to climb the Gargano park, Florian will ride the Foggia plain. The road rises. A little before arriving in the village of Mattinata, I am confronted with a Cornelian dilemma: on one side a winding road that climbs up the mountainside, on the other a tunnel.  A flat tunnel. But a tunnel that is forbidden to bicycles. Since the road doesn’t seem to offer particularly interesting views, I decide to save my strength for the next climb that should take me to the cliff side and take the tunnel. The crossing goes smoothly, without horns, almost without cars. At the exit, however, a police patrol is parked on the side of the road. Ouch. They signal me to stop. Double ouch. The guy says something to me in Italian where I catch the words « bici » (=bike) and « galleria » (=tunnel). I deduce that he’s asking me if I’ve just cycled through the tunnel. I answer candidly that I did.  I imagine that he is saying something about the fact that it is forbidden, but even with all the good will in the world I don’t understand a word. I say a timid « no comprendo ». I see the disappointment in his eyes. He then says to me with a great Italian accent « ah, you don’t speak » and signals me to go. It’s hard not to laugh as I leave. At the exit of Mattinata, same situation: tunnel or road? I take the road this time, and rightly so! On one hand I have great views on the coast, and on the other hand there are again cops at the exit of the second tunnel… The « ah you don’t speak » technique might not have worked twice…

The night will soon fall and I have to think about finding a place to sleep. There is a beach, a little far, but which seems very nice and not too far from the main road. I say to myself: « let’s try it, and if ever it’s too late I will stop in a high place with a view on the sea ». The call of the sea is too strong, and in spite of the growing darkness that my lamp hardly manages to dissipate, I finish to go down (fortunately!) the last kilometers in the dark to arrive at the beach of Portogreco. I don’t fully enjoy the view in the evening but it’s a treat the next day when I wake up…

The morning is all the more pleasant as the road continues to wind along the sea, with a plunging view on the white of the cliffs and the black abyss of the caves. It’s well worth it to add a few hundred meters of climbing to admire all this! And the villages of Vieste, Peschici and Rodi Garganico are arriving just at the right time to take a little break and fill my water bottles…

Vieste
Peschici

Then comes the least nice part of the day: headwind, endless straight lines, not a tree to break this damn wind, which makes annoys me so much that I start to insult it, and I think it had not happened to me since Spain… Besides, we reach the hottest hours of the day, the water of the fountains is tepid, and it becomes complicated to find a shady place… Only positive point, I ride along fields of tomatoes, of all shapes and colors and I allow myself to pick up a few of them to quench my thirst and appease my hunger at once.

More and more tomatoes

After a quick passage through Termoli, I meet Florian on a beach a little bit away, perfect for a bivouac. Except for the mosquitoes, the evening is good, the feast royal, and the night not too hot!

The next day, direction Pescara! I leave the navigation to Florian and I’m glad! He first finds us a small path along the cliffs and then a beautiful bikeway! At the beginning I am a little too excited, I have the impression that it will bring us to Pescara. Then I look at the map a little more in details and I realize that it stops in Ortona. And in reality, we come across some works that force us to turn back and to push the bikes on a small paved road to get to the main road again… Yon can’t always win…

Track along the cliffs…
… and bike path along the sea

When we arrive in Pescara, we have a nice pizza and a cold beer to celebrate the arrival and our paths separate again: Florian continues along the coast and I go for a ride in the mountains in the Grand Sasso park. I take advantage of the afternoon to have a look at Pescara and of the evening to, guess what, eat! We won’t change the good habits!

The installation Ecco Trash People on the piazza Salotto

Comme disent les allemands, «Man trifft sich immer zweimal im Leben»

Jour 363, Pescara, 24.261 km

En arrivant à Bari, je galère (un peu) à monter les deux étages qui mènent à l’auberge de jeunesse tout en portant mon vélo et les bagages. J’entends le gérant qui jure « encore un vélo énorme !! ». Tiens, me dis-je, un autre cycliste est déjà dans la place !? Effectivement, je fais assez rapidement la connaissance de Florian, allemand vivant au Danemark, qui est parti de Grèce il y a quelques jours et remonte vers l’Allemagne… On accroche assez vite et on décide de faire la route jusqu’à Pescara ensemble. Enfin presque, je veux aller faire un tour dans le parc du Gargano, Florian préfère couper par l’intérieur des terres. On se séparera mais on se retrouvera, c’est de toute façon ce que les allemands disent…

Mais avant ça, il a déjà fallu atteindre Bari. Et on ne va pas parler de gueule de bois, on dira seulement que je suis un peu dans le gaz en me levant le matin. Ah les lendemains de finale… Les préparatifs prennent un peu plus de temps que d’habitude, le temps que mon cerveau et mes membres (re)trouvent leur synchronisation, mais je finir par parvenir à me mettre en route en milieu de matinée. Je me retrouve rapidement (et sans vraiment le savoir, les yeux aussi ne sont manifestement pas complètement coordonnés avec le cerveau) sur l’autoroute.  Au vu de mes expériences passées, je me dis que ce n’est pas forcément une mauvaise chose. Puis je change rapidement d’avis : cette fois, un camion sur deux klaxonne en passant, une voiture sur trois aussi, et il y a tellement de gens qu’on me double rarement avec plus d’un mètre de marge. Pas si terrible que ça finalement. Heureusement, une voie de service me fait de l’œil, et elle a le bon goût de suivre l’autoroute jusqu’à Bari. Et de me faire passer par de jolies villes sur la côte : Brindisi, Monopoli (comme il m’a manqué le Catane, il me manque aussi le Monopoly) ou encore Polignano a Mare. Toujours sous un soleil radieux, sur un terrain plat et sans vent…

Monopoli
Polignano a Mare

Avant d’arriver à Bari, je remarque la prolifération dans les champs de ce que je prends au premier regard pour des sortes de four à pain. Un peu grands certes, mais peut être que la tradition locale veut que les miches soient plutôt de la taille de meules… Ou alors que les pizzas fassent toutes un mètre de diamètre… Bref, de belles idées qui me passent par la tête… La vérité est bien plus triviale, il s’agit de « trulli », des habitats d’ouvriers agricoles, des maisons finalement… Pour les grands pains, on repassera.

Les trulli au bord de la mer

J’arrive un peu tard à Bari, et surtout très affamé, donc je cherche rapidement de quoi me sustenter… Pour la visite de la ville, il faudra revenir… Le lendemain, après un petit déjeuner et un ravitaillement au supermarché, c’est donc un quatuor qui prend la sortie de Bari, un quintette même en comptant Bob ! Vent arrière, quelques nuages pour empêcher que la température ne grimpe trop, une route pas trop fréquentée et bien plate, des conditions idéales pour discuter. Un peu moins pour profiter du paysage du coup, mais on fait dans le classique côte / plage avec des milliers de parasols / ville côtière / station balnéaire. Et quand il semble que ça va changer, qu’on va être sur un bras de terre avec la mer des deux côtés, on se retrouve en fait à longer des marais salants d’une couleur rosâtre peu ragoutante et des usines. Heureusement qu’on peut discuter au final !

Deux vélos…
… et deux cyclistes

Un peu avant Manfredonia (j’ai vérifié, tous les habitants portent Manfred comme deuxième prénom, depuis la fondation de la ville par le roi Manfred 1er de Sicile), nos chemins se séparent une première fois : je me lance à l’assaut du parc du Gargano, Florian s’attaque à la plaine de Foggia. La route s’élève. Un peu avant d’arriver dans le village de Mattinata, je me trouve confronté à un dilemme cornélien : d’un côté une route en lacet qui grimpe à flanc de montagne, de l’autre un tunnel.  Un tunnel plat. Mais un tunnel interdit aux vélos. Étant donné que la route ne semble pas offrir de vues particulièrement intéressantes, je décide de garder mes forces pour la prochaine montée qui doit m’amener à flanc de falaise et de prendre le tunnel. La traversée se déroule sans encombres, sans klaxon, quasiment sans voitures. A la sortie, en revanche, une patrouille de police est stationnée sur le bord de la route. Aie. On me fait signe de m’arrêter. Aie Aie. Le type me dit un truc en italien où je saisis les mots « bici » (=vélo) et « galleria » (= tunnel). J’en déduis qu’il me demande si je viens de traverser le tunnel à vélo. Je réponds candidement que oui.  J’imagine qu’il me dit quelque chose en rapport avec le fait que ce soit interdit mais même avec toute la bonne volonté du monde je ne comprends pas un traître mot. Je lance un timide « no comprendo ». Je vois la déception dans ses yeux. Il me dit alors avec un accent italien grandiose « ah, you don’t speak » et me fait signe d’y aller. J’ai du mal à ne pas rire en repartant. À la sortie de Mattinata, même situation : tunnel ou route ? Je prends la route cette fois, et à raison ! D’une part j’ai des vues superbes sur la côte, et d’autre part il y a encore des flics à la sortie du second tunnel… La technique du « ah you don’t speak » n’aurait peut-être pas fonctionné deux fois…

La nuit ne va pas tarder à tomber et il faut songer à se trouver un endroit pour dormir. Il y a une plage, un peu loin, mais qui a l’air très sympa et pas trop loin de la route principale. Je me dis : « on le tente, et si jamais ça fait trop tard je m’arrêterait dans un coin en hauteur avec vue sur la mer ». L’appel de la mer est trop fort, et malgré l’obscurité grandissante que ma lampe parvient à peine à dissiper, je finis de descendre (heureusement !) les derniers kilomètres dans le noir pour arriver à la plage de Portogreco. Je ne profite pas pleinement de la vue le soir mais c’est un régal le lendemain au réveil…

La matinée est d’autant plus agréable que la route continue de sinuer le long de la mer, avec une vue plongeante sur le blanc des falaises et le gouffre noir des grottes. Ça vaut bien le coup de se rajouter quelques centaines de mètres de dénivelé positif pour admirer tout cela ! Et les villages de Vieste, Peschici et Rodi Garganico se présentent à point nommé pour faire une petite pause et remplir mes gourdes…

Vieste
Peschici

Puis vient la partie la moins sympa de la journée : vent de face, des lignes droites interminables, pas un arbre pour casser ce satané vent, qui me fatigue tellement que je me mets à l’insulter, et je crois que ça ne m’était pas arrivé depuis l’Espagne… En plus on atteint les heures les plus chaudes de la journée, l’eau des fontaines est tiédasse, et ça devient compliqué de trouver un coin d’ombre… Seul point positif, je longe des champs de tomates, de toutes les formes et de toutes les couleurs et je me permets d’en ramasser quelques-unes pour d’un seul coup étancher ma soif et apaiser ma faim.

Toujours plus de tomates

Après un rapide passage par Termoli, je retrouve Florian sur une plage un peu à l’écart, parfaite pour un bivouac. Si on excepte les moustiques un peu agressifs, la soirée est bonne, le festin royal, et la nuit pas trop chaude !

Le lendemain, direction Pescara ! Je laisse la navigation à Florian et bien m’en prend ! Il nous dégotte d’abord un petit parcours le long des falaises puis une magnifique piste cyclable ! Au départ je m’enflamme un peu, j’ai l’impression qu’elle va nous amener jusqu’à Pescara. Puis je regarde la carte un peu plus en détails et me rends compte qu’elle s’arrête à Ortona. Et en réalité, on tombe sur des travaux qui nous forcent à faire demi-tour et à pousser les vélos sur un petit chemin pavé pour retrouver la route principale… On ne peut pas non gagner à tous les coups…

Piste le long des falaises…
… et voie cyclable le long de la mer

En arrivant à Pescara, on s’offre une belle pizza et une bière bien fraîche pour fêter l’arrivée et nos chemins se séparent à nouveau : Florian continue le long de la côte et je vais faire un tour dans les montagnes dans le parc du Grand Sasso. Je profite de l’après-midi pour faire un tour de Pescara et de la soirée pour, devinez quoi, me goinfrer ! On ne va pas changer les bonnes habitudes !

L’installation Ecco Trash People sur la piazza Salotto

Finals Day

Day 359, Lecce, 23.685 km

5:35. I hear voices, people walking around the tent. It’s a bit early to go hiking. At the same time if we take into account the fact that between 9 am and 6 pm it’s more than 30°, it seems to make sense to leave early in the morning… Me who had planned a short day, I’m going to arrive even earlier than planned! It will leave me time to go around the city. The signs were pointing out a nice lake on the side of the road that I didn’t have the courage to go and see the day before, so I’ll have a first small break for the day…

Cava di Bauxite

11:30. I arrive in Lecce. The heat is overwhelming, and apart from the 2-3 pedestrian streets of the historical center, the city is like a ghost town. As if everyone was taking a nap. Or went to the beach. But the Italian flag is everywhere. On the balconies. On the windows. At the souvenir stands for tourists. Today Italy is in the Finals. First Wimbledon, then the Euro Cup. It’s so hot that I shorten my tour in the city, find a shady place to eat and drink…

19:15. After a good shower, a little nap and the writing of most of this article, I leave the hostel. People don’t take a nap anymore apparently, they all decided to walk the streets as the temperatures are getting warmer. The TV screens are out, the Italian jerseys are out, and the first Aperol Spritzs are out. Berrettini did resist but the first final was lost. The tension is building up.

21:00. Kick-off. The Fratelli d’Italia has been heartedly sung by everyone, God Save the Queen has been booed a little, and the ball starts to circulate to the sound of « Forza Azzurra ».

21:02. England scores. Cold snap. The first chants die out. Difficult start.

21:50. Half-time. Italy is dominated, England has the game in hand. I go from a bar in the city center to the one of the hostel, to see if the atmosphere is more joyful. Not really. Italians are nervous…

22:40. Italy equalizes. The explosion of joy is equal to the relief. “One more goal” and it’s done!

23:30. Penalty shootout. Not the best for sensitive hearts. When the Italian goalkeeper stops the last English penalty kick, the glasses are thrown in the air, the flags fly, people jump into each other’s arms, Italy is the European champion!

04:30. The last scooters have gone home, the bars have closed. The rare walkers still up yell « Italiaaaaa » when we pass by them. The party was beautiful, the awakening will be hard but it is the lot of the champions!

Complicated start (for the photographer too…)
Champions!

Now back to Crotone. I had spotted this stage. Flat. For more than 200 km. And since I had exceeded 200 km from Besançon to Barr, I had in the back of my mind the idea to reach 250 km one day… So I have the ideal playground, from Crotone to Matera. An early start to be able to ride a bit more if the wind doesn’t push me enough, and that should do it! As usual, the best plan in the world does not resist to reality: I go to bed late to finish my article, so I get up late too. When I get out of the B&B, I talk with the workers of the warehouse across the street, in Italian. We have a good laugh. And then, at the café where I have breakfast, I talk again with Roberto, who would like to go on a ride too but who needs a cart to take his dog with him. All this is very nice, but my departure at dawn turns into a quiet departure around 9 am. No problem…

It doesn’t matter, because after the first 40 km where I ride well but not too fast, the wind gets up and pushes me. Between 27 and 30km/h for hours. Kilometers fly by. I find (fresh!) water when I need it, it’s almost too easy. Then the (national) road that I follow turns into a highway. At first I think there must be a service road on the side or something and I can continue. Not even that. I don’t hesitate very long, I have a distance record to beat and no time or legs to go for a detour through the mountains. Moreover, it doesn’t seem to bother anyone, neither the other drivers who don’t honk at me more than usual, nor even the cops who pass me by busloads without even a glance… And in the end, the highway is almost more comfortable than the national road: the asphalt is clean, like a pool table, and on top of that, it’s a two-lane road, so people have twice as much space to pass me. I am almost less stressed out than on the main road. With two exceptions: first, a guy who overtakes me and hits the safety barrier 500 m ahead of me. Except for his mirror, nothing is broken but it was a bit too close for my taste. Then, a truck passing me, while I was passing someone stopped on the hard shoulder and a car was passing him too. Four abreast, even if it’s a two lane road, that’s not a lot of space…

It was either that or the highway
So highway

Once arrived in Metaponte, I leave the highway and go inland towards Matera. The wind is still pushing me but my legs are starting to pull a bit. I stop in a farm to ask for water, there is a guy working in a tomato field. He yells to his colleague to bring me a bottle, then turns to me and asks if I want to taste his tomatoes. Let’s go ! I take one, it’s a bit warm but juicy, very good. He looks at me and says « More, more ». So I take 5 of them and I eat my fill. My beard, my hands and my shirt are full of it and he signals me to eat more! If I had wanted to, I could have left with a whole crate! The bottle arrives, quite fresh, and I end up taking my leave, even if I was close to ask if I could stay… But with only 15 km to go it would have been too stupid… A nice lake later, my watch vibrates : 250 ! I hesitate to stop on the spot and sleep on the ground but I ride another 700 m before finding a field a bit hidden, I eat and sleep!

The sun is setting, it feels like the end
The lake of San Giuliano

The next day, I ride the 20 km (uphill) that separate me from Matera, I leave my bike under the surveillance of the employee of the tourist office and I go for a walk in town. I mean, I walk for 45 minutes, then I have a coffee for an hour and lunch for another hour. But I still have time to admire Matera, a very ancient city where the inhabitants used to live in unsanitary caves, caves that have since been renovated, transformed into museums, hotels and restaurants, and are now part of the Unesco world heritage.

Leaving Matera, I am overtaken by Pascuale, with whom I start a conversation. He goes to Castellaneta, and proposes me to go there for a beer. I even get a little history lesson: Castellaneta, the city of myth. Rodolfo Valentino (if you don’t know him, don’t worry, I didn’t know him either, and I don’t think many people outside of Castellaneta, let alone outside of Italy, know who Rodolfo Valentino is). An Italian actor from the 20s. If you ever don’t know what to watch on your next movie night, « The Sheik » looks like one of his classics…

Pascuale and Rodolfo

I go through Taranto, do 2-3 errands and start looking for a beach to cool off. I’m a bit picky at the beginning, I would like a sandy beach with few people, a bit of shade and a shower if possible. In the end I have to face the facts: these beaches do not exist, there are people everywhere, except on the rocks. I find a small access near the road, jump in the water and stop for the day.

Taranto
The sun sets…

I put myself a little bit close to the road: there is a lot of traffic until late in the night, and moreover I am right under the light of the street lamps. Anyway, I’m good for an agitated night and I leave early the next day. I follow the coast, it’s even easier than following the GPS! Everything flat, beaches full of people as soon as 8:30 am, not a square centimeter available at 11:00 am, the ride is pleasant. A little stress when I see a bike path along the beach, I have a bad memory of an arrival in Almeria that comes back. I tell myself that if I see the slightest trace of sand I will turn back. In the end the road is clear, everything is fine…

Beautiful towns come and go, Nardo and its turquoise lagoon, Gallipoli and its jet-ski races, or Santa Maria di Leuca and its basilica. I begin to think that I will stop soon, as soon as I find a beach without too many people I go for a swim and if possible I stop for the night. As the day before, I am daydreaming! I start by going up, a superb road which winds on the side of a cliff, but it is more complicated for the beaches… Very nice on the other hand…

I find the perfect place, in a pine forest, with a path going down to the sea, I’m looking forward to this good evening I’ll have. Unfortunately, I’m on a private property and I’m quickly informed about it. And followed until I am on the road again. Then comes the most eastern point of Italy. I tell myself that it could be nice for the night too. The parking is full, the descent full of rocks and I don’t want to go back up if I can’t stay down there for the night. Too bad, let’s go on… By the way, this most Eastern point of Italy is probably also the most Eastern point of my trip, unless I manage to go to Albania…

The far East

Finally I find a rocky beach, on a hiking path that I hope is not too busy (haha) and I collapse once I have eaten my dinner… Tomorrow is Finals day…

Jour de finales

Jour 359, Lecce, 23.685 km

5h35. J’entends des voix, des gens qui marchent autour de la tente. Ça fait un peu tôt pour randonner. En même temps si on prend en considération le fait qu’entre 9h et 18h il fait plus de 30°, ça paraît censé de partir tôt le matin… Moi qui avait prévu une petite journée, je vais arriver encore plus tôt que prévu ! Ça me laissera le temps de faire un tour en ville. Les panneaux signalaient un joli lac sur le bord de la route que je n’avais pas eu le courage d’aller voir la veille, ça me fait une première petite pause pour la journée…

Cava di Bauxite

11h30. J’arrive à Lecce. La chaleur est écrasante, et en dehors des 2-3 rues piétonnes du centre historique, la ville est comme morte. Comme si tout le monde faisait la sieste. Ou était parti à la plage. En revanche le drapeau italien est partout. Aux balcons. Aux fenêtres. Aux kiosques de souvenirs pour touristes. Aujourd’hui l’Italie est en finale. De Wimbledon d’abord, de l’Euro ensuite. Il fait tellement chaud que j’écourte mon tour en ville, me trouve un coin à l’ombre pour manger un bout et boire un coup…

19h15. Après avoir pris une bonne douche, fait une petite sieste et rédigé la majeure partie de cet article, je sors de l’auberge. Les gens ne font plus la sieste apparemment, ils ont tous décidé d’arpenter les rues alors que les températures se font plus clémentes. Les écrans télés sont sortis, les maillots de l’Italie aussi, et les premiers Apérol Spritz ont fait long feu. Berrettini a fait de la résistance mais la première finale a été perdue. On sent la tension qui monte…

21h00. Coup d’envoi. Le Fratelli d’Italia a été repris en cœur par tout le monde, God Save the Queen a lui été un peu sifflé, et le ballon commence à circuler au son des « Forza Azzurra ».

21h02. But de l’Angleterre. Coup de froid. Les premiers chants de supporters s’éteignent. Début de match difficile.

21h50. Mi-temps. L’Italie est dominée, l’Angleterre a le match en main. Je passe d’un bar du centre-ville à celui de l’auberge, pour voir si l’ambiance y est plus joyeuse. Pas vraiment. Les italiens sont nerveux…

22h40. Egalisation de l’Italie. L’explosion de joie est à la hauteur du soulagement. « One more goal », plus qu’un but et c’est fait !

23h30. Il va falloir en passer par les tirs au but. Ames sensibles s’abstenir. Quand le gardien italien sort le dernier tir au but anglais, les verres volent, les drapeaux flottent de plus belle, les gens se sautent dans les bras, l’Italie est championne d’Europe !

04h30. Les derniers scooters sont rentrés, les bars ont fermé. Les rares promeneurs encore debout lancent un « Italiaaaaaa » quand on les croise. La fête a été belle, le réveil sera dur mais c’est le lot des champions !

Début de match compliqué (pour le photographe aussi…)
Champions !

Revenons maintenant à Crotone. J’avais repéré cette étape. Du plat. Pendant plus de 200 km. Et depuis que j’avais dépassé les 200 km en allant de Besançon à Barr, j’avais dans un coin de la tête l’idée d’atteindre un jour les 250 km… J’ai donc trouvé le terrain de jeu idéal, de Crotone à Matera. Un départ aux aurores pour pouvoir rouler un peu plus si jamais le vent ne me pousse pas assez, et ça devrait pouvoir le faire ! Comme d’habitude, le meilleur plan du monde ne résiste pas à la réalité : je me couche tard pour finir mon article, donc je me lève tard aussi. En descendant du B&B je discute avec les manutentionnaires de l’entrepôt d’en face, en italien. On rigole bien. Et ensuite, au café où je prends mon petit-déjeuner, je discute encore avec Roberto, qui partirait bien lui aussi mais à qui il faudrait une chariotte pour emmener son chien. Très sympa tout ça, mais mon départ aux aurores se transforme en départ tranquille vers 9h. Pas grave…

Pas grave, parce qu’après une première quarantaine de kilomètres où je roule bien mais pas trop vite, le vent se lève et me pousse. Entre 27 et 30km/h pendant des heures. Ça défile. Je trouve de l’eau quand il faut, fraiche en plus, c’est presque trop facile. Puis la route (nationale) que je suis se transforme en autoroute. Au début je me dis qu’il doit y avoir une voie de service sur le côté ou quelque chose du genre et je vais pouvoir continuer. Même pas. Je n’hésite pas très longtemps, j’ai un record de distance à battre et pas le temps ni les jambes d’aller faire un détour par les montagnes. En plus ça ne semble déranger personne, ni les autres automobilistes qui ne me klaxonnent pas plus que d’habitude, ni même les flics qui me doublent par cars entier sans même un regard… Et au final l’autoroute, c’est presque plus confortable que la route nationale : l’asphalte est propre, un vrai billard, et en plus c’est une deux voies donc les gens ont deux fois plus de place pour me doubler. Je suis presque plus serein que sur la nationale. A deux exceptions près tout de même : d’abord, un type qui me double et qui va taper la barrière de sécurité 500 m devant moi. A part son rétro rien de cassé mais c’était un peu trop près à mon goût. Ensuite, un camion qui me double, alors que je double quelqu’un arrêté sur la bande d’arrêt d’urgence et qu’une voiture le double aussi. A 4 de front, même si c’est une deux voies, ça fait pas large…

C’était ça ou l’autoroute
Donc autoroute

Une fois arrivé à Metaponte, je quitte l’autoroute et remonte dans les terres vers Matera. Le vent me pousse toujours mais les jambes commencent un peu à tirer. Je m’arrête dans une ferme pour demander de l’eau, il y a un type qui travaille dans un champ de tomates. Il hurle à son collègue de m’apporter une bouteille, puis se retourne vers moi et me demande si je veux goûter ses tomates. Allons-y ! J’en prends une, c’est un peu tiède mais bien juteux, très bon. Il me regarde et me dit « Encore, encore ». Du coup j’en prends 5 et je me goinfre. J’en ai plein la barbe, les mains et le tee-shirt et il me fait signe de manger encore ! Si j’avais voulu, j’aurais surement pu repartir avec une cagette entière ! La bouteille arrive, bien fraîche, et je finis par prendre congé, même si j’étais à deux doigts de demander si je pouvais rester… Mais à 15 km près ça aurait été trop bête… Un joli lac plus tard, ma montre vibre : 250 ! ça y est ! J’hésite à m’arrêter sur place et à dormir par terre mais je roule encore 700 m avant de trouver un champ un peu caché, je mange et dodo !

Le soleil se couche, ça sent la fin
Le lac de San Giuliano

Le lendemain, je fais péniblement les 20 km (de montée) qui me séparent de Matera, je laisse mon vélo sous la surveillance de l’employé de l’office de tourisme et je pars me promener en ville. Enfin je me promène pendant 45 minutes, ensuite je prends un café pendant une heure et un déjeuner pendant une autre heure. Mais j’ai tout de même le temps d’admirer Matera, une ville très ancienne où les habitants vivaient dans des caves insalubres, caves qui ont depuis été rénovées, transformées en musées, hôtels et restaurants, et font maintenant partie du patrimoine mondial de l’Unesco.

En sortant de Matera, je me fais doubler par Pascuale, avec qui je noue la conversation. Il va à Castellaneta, et me propose d’aller y boire une bière. J’ai même le droit à un petit cours d’histoire : Castellaneta, la ville du Mythe. Rodolfo Valentino. (Si vous ne connaissez pas, ne vous inquiétez pas, je ne connaissais pas non plus, et je pense que peu de gens en dehors de Castellaneta, et encore moins en dehors de l’Italie savent qui est Rodolfo Valentino). Un acteur italien des années 20. Si jamais vous ne savez pas quoi regarder lors de votre prochaine soirée cinéma, « Le Cheikh » a l’air d’être un de ses classiques…

Pascuale et Rodolfo

Je traverse Taranto, fais 2-3 courses et me mets en quête d’une plage pour me rafraichir. Je fais un peu le difficile au départ, je voudrais une plage de sable avec peu de monde, un peu d’ombre et une douche si possible. Au final je dois me rendre à l’évidence : ces plages-là n’existent pas, il y a du monde partout, sauf sur les rochers. Je trouve tout de même un petit accès près de la route, saute dans l’eau et m’arrête pour la journée.

Taranto
Le soleil se couche…

Je me suis mis un peu près de la route : il y a beaucoup de passage jusque tard dans la nuit, et en plus je suis en plein sous la lumière des lampadaires. Mais bon, j’en suis quitte pour une nuit un peu agitée et je repars tôt le lendemain. Je longe la côte, c’est encore plus simple que de suivre le GPS ! Tout plat, des plages noires de monde dès 8h30, plus un centimètre carré de disponible à 11h00, la ballade est agréable. Petit coup de stress quand je vois une piste cyclable le long de la plage, j’ai un mauvais souvenir d’une arrivée à Almeria qui remonte. Je me dis que si je vois la moindre trace de sable je fais demi-tour. Au final la route est dégagée, tout va bien…

Les jolies villes viennent et passent, Nardo et son lagon turquoise, Gallipoli et ses courses de jet-ski, ou encore Santa Maria di Leuca et sa basilique. Je commence à me dire que je ne vais pas tarder à m’arrêter, dès que je trouve une plage sans trop de monde je me baigne et si possible je bivouaque. Comme la veille, je me fourre le doigt dans l’œil ! Je commence par monter, une superbe route qui serpente à flanc de falaise, mais du coup c’est plus compliqué pour les plages… Très joli en revanche…

Je trouve le coin parfait, dans une pinède, avec un chemin qui descend vers la mer, je me réjouis d’avance à l’idée de cette bonne soirée que je vais passer. Manque de pot, je suis sur une propriété privée et on se charge très rapidement de me le faire savoir. Et de me suivre jusqu’à ce que je sois à nouveau sur la route. Arrive ensuite le point le plus à l’Est d’Italie. Je me dis que ça aussi ça pourrait être sympa pour la nuit. Le parking est plein, la descente pleine de cailloux et j’ai pas envie de la remonter si jamais je ne peux pas me poser en bas. Tant pis, on continue… Au passage, ce point le plus à l’Est d’Italie est probablement aussi le point le plus à l’Est de mon voyage, à moins que je n’arrive à aller jusqu’en Albanie…

Le grand Est

Finalement je trouve une plage de rochers, sur un chemin de randonnée que j’espère n’être pas trop fréquenté (haha) et je m’écroule une fois le dîner avalé… Le lendemain, c’est jour de finale…

Etna; Etna

Day 355, Crotone, 23.071 km

If you want to read with music, here is the original soundtrack (think « Etna » during the chorus, you’ll see it’s like you’re there). 

Then, for those who are worried about my water state, you should know that since my acid pamphlet, my indictment of the water terrorists in these same columns last week, everything is back to normal: the cemeteries are open, the fountains are working, the « points » are back to being water points, I can drink my fill, and I don’t deprive myself of it… Seems that some messages come through…

4 intense days. That’s the least I can say… With the main character, at least for the first two days, the above-mentioned volcano. And as soon as I leave Syracuse, I see it. It will not leave me for 3 days. It crushes everything else from the top of its 3.300 meters. It is present, it is there: Etna. A short transition stage to Catania, where I spend the afternoon walking and preparing the next day’s stage, including eating the most gigantic pizza I’ve ever seen in Italy! (even with my crazy hunger I had difficulties to finish it…). At first I thought I’d go to the top of the volcano with Jay, but some research on the Internet quickly gave me a better idea: rather than struggling on mountain bike tracks, there are two accesses by the road, one to the south / one to the north, it’s a bit tough but it seems doable. After the double ration of Ventoux, a double ration of Etna!

You can’t miss it
Fountain, elephant, church, you can find everything in Catania

Departure in the early morning, after a copious breakfast, for the first ascent, the one of the south side. After a « soft » transition (not excessively flat either) and surprisingly devoid of cars (it must be the Sunday morning effect), we enter in the heart of the matter at the exit of Nicolosi. A regular slope, and quickly the landscape is transformed. I have memories of my trip in Iceland which go back up: the black sand on the side of the road, these tortured forms of rocks staked out by bushes, no doubt, we are near a volcano. With always in line of sight, which dominates us from all up there, the main crater of Etna and behind me the sea which fades away.

Catania and the sea in the distance

Arrived at the Sapienza refuge, at the end of my first ascent of the day, I am a little disappointed: I cannot see the main crater, hidden as it is by other craters. And I don’t dare to leave the bike too long and too out of sight, so a too long hike or a ride in the cable car are excluded. After a few tours of the craters accessible on foot, I say to myself that being « disappointed » is perhaps a bit much, the views are still quite incredible. And I even have the pleasant surprise to meet my breakfast companions who are doing a tour with the hostel’s manager. The world (well, Etna) is small!

You might be able to tell from the previous pictures, but I have a nice descent ahead of me. And the manager of the hostel tells me before leaving: « Be careful, there is a lot of sand on the road – Yes, Yes ». As soon as I say it, I forget it, and I start to ride downhill! And after almost 40 km of climbing, I don’t feel like hitting the brakes. First turn, 40 km/h, I go a little wide, I see at the last moment a pile of sand in the elbow, I feel my rear wheel starting to chase, I don’t dare to brake, nor to turn my handlebars, I see myself going straight into the safety barrier (all this happens of course in a fraction of a second, by the time you read this it has already happened 4 times). But it was only a small pile of sand, I quickly regain grip and a stable attitude. But I understand the « Be careful ». I also understand a little bit what people who told me they were afraid on the downhill can feel. Plus the sand is often in the turns, and I don’t see it until the last moment… 

At the bottom in one piece, I just have time to fill the water bottles and I start the second ascent of the day. A lot in the forest (in the shade, cool) at the beginning, I take advantage of every opportunity where I see the main crater to take a picture of it. Even against the light. Even if it’s the same thing every time. And as I take more and more pictures, I say to myself « Well, it’s funny this cloud, it looks like there’s smoke coming out of the volcano… »

Looking at it more closely, I’m thinking that it’s a rather big cloud, and there are weird noises too. A storm? But the sky is blue all around, I haven’t suddenly become a weather expert, but it doesn’t look like a storm. I finally realize that I am witnessing an eruption of Mount Etna. I would have liked to tell you that I had to avoid torrents of lava, that I had to dodge a rain of molten rock, that thanks to my faithful steed I was able to rescue a family in distress and get them out of the flames of the inferno, but mostly I saw a lot of smoke. And the people around me didn’t look that worried. But it’s still very impressive, so much so that I completely forgot to take pictures of Piano Provenzana, which concludes the ascent of the northern part of Etna. So you will only have pictures of the eruption…

What I didn’t fail to notice, however, is that the double ration of Etna succeeded where the double ration of Ventoux had failed: I have a new record of positive elevation gain in one day: 3.263 m! Most of it in the first 80 kilometers, which incidentally means 40 kilometers of descent, without sand this time, a real treat! I arrive on the coast, in the beautiful village of Taormina. A little dip in the water to refresh myself, and I start to look for a bivouac. As the night is falling and the two paths that are supposed to lead me a little away in the forest are in reality private paths, I end up settling on the side of the road…

Naxos and Taormina
Isola Bella

The next day, I take the road to Messina, give a high five to Poseidon and take the ferry to Italy. And I get the SS106 road again where I had left it, at Villa San Giovanni, and I continue my journey, wind at my back, towards the south of Italy. I notice that Etna has still not left me, it still watches over us from the other side of the strait…

Etna seems to come out of the water

I intend to follow the coast to Crotone, but I see a sign pointing north to the national park of Aspromonte. I remember having noted somewhere that it was worth taking a look at it. So I change my itinerary and decide to go for the mountains! During a water break, I meet a French guy who is also cycling around Italy, in the same direction, and we spend a good moment to discuss. At the moment of leaving, he realizes that his rear wheel is flat, and I abandon him to his repair… The discussion was pleasant and longer than expected, and I begin the first kilometers of the climb at about 18:30. Moreover the wind has risen, against me, and I start to feel my legs. I stop in a supermarket to buy something to improve my dinner (a beer, a piece of cheese and a tray of tomatoes) and while talking with one of the employees in a more than approximate Italian, I finally understand that the road I was going to take is blocked. It’s a bit much. Moreover the alternative road he advises me (and that I follow) goes up very (too?) much, and even if the view on the valley in the descent is rather nice, I’m fed up with it and I stop in the first field where a hedge of trees hides me a little from the road.

The next day, after 450m of flat, I start to climb. It’s hard and it doesn’t stop. When I think I’m at the top, when I say to myself: « there are no more trees above, we won’t be able to climb much higher », I take the next slope at 1000%. And I have the impression that it lasts at least 25 km (probably more around 10). Even if the view on the valley is great, I can’t wait to reach the top…

Then follows a small rolling part, in the forest, which reminds me a bit of the Czech Republic (and the emotional memory of bivouacs in the woods, without cars or neighbors) and I arrive at a crossroads: on the right, I go back down towards the coast and the sea. To the left, I continue in the park, in the mountain, with the promise of other climbs. And of course, I turn left! Forget the last few kilometers, the burning legs and the excruciating climbs. It seems that memory is selective. To convince myself of the validity of my decision, I put together some solid arguments: 1. Very few cars. 2. Fresh water springs to quench my thirst. 3. Between 800 and 1,100 m of altitude, it’s rather 25° than 35°. 4. The higher it is, the more beautiful it is! And a little voice inside me hopes that the upcoming climbs won’t be as horrible as the one in the morning… In the end I got everything right, the hardest was behind and the most beautiful in front…

I only have to cover the short distance that still separates me from Crotone, a matter of half a day. Which doesn’t start well, since I decide to follow the main road, its trucks and other driving enthusiasts, while a small road winds quietly along the cliff. Then I meet a guy who compliments me on my Italian, it’s 9:30 am, I don’t know what he drank but it seems efficient. I even manage to order a meal without a word of English (I’m not sure what I’m eating, but it’s very good), and I don’t have the heart to refuse a coffee when I see the reaction of the chef at the first attempt!

Capo Colonna and its Roman remains
A coffee – No thanks – Are you sure? – Well, ok.

And for those who have trouble keeping up with all these names, a little point on the map: 

Etna, Etna

Jour 355, Crotone, 23.071 km

Si vous voulez lire en musique, voilà la bande originale (pensez « Etna » pendant le refrain, vous verrez on s’y croirait).  

Ensuite, pour ceux qui s’inquièteraient de mon état hydraulique, sachez que depuis mon pamphlet acide, que dis-je, mon réquisitoire en règle envers les terroristes de l’eau dans ces mêmes colonnes la semaine dernière, tout est revenu à la normale : les cimetières sont ouverts, les fontaines fonctionnent, les « points d’ » sont redevenus des points d’eau, je peux boire tout mon saoul, et je ne m’en prive pas… Comme quoi certains messages semblent porter…

4 jours intenses. C’est le moins qu’on puisse dire… Avec en personnage principal, du moins pour les deux premiers jours, le susnommé volcan. Et dès que je sors de Syracuse, je le vois. Il ne va pas me quitter pendant 3 jours. Il écrase tout le reste du haut de ses 3.300 mètres. Il est présent, il est là : l’Etna. Petite étape de transition jusqu’à Catane, où je passe l’après-midi à me promener et à préparer l’étape du lendemain, notamment en mangeant la pizza la plus gigantesque qu’il m’ait été donné de voir en Italie ! (même avec ma faim de loup j’ai eu du mal à la finir…). Au départ je pensais monter tout en haut du volcan avec Jay, mais quelques recherches sur Internet me donnent assez rapidement une meilleure idée : plutôt que de galérer sur des pistes de VTT, il y a deux accès par la route, un au sud / un au nord, ça fait une journée un peu costaud mais ça semble faisable. Après la double ration de Ventoux, une double ration de l’Etna!

On ne peut pas le rater
Fontaine, éléphant, église, on trouve de tout à Catane

Départ au petit matin, après un petit déjeuner copieux, pour la première ascension, celle du versant sud. Après une transition « douce » (pas excessivement plate non plus) et étonnamment dénuée de voitures (ça doit être l’effet dimanche matin), on rentre dans le vif du sujet à la sortie de Nicolosi. Une pente régulière, et rapidement le paysage se transforme. J’ai des souvenirs de mon périple en Islande qui remontent : le sable noir sur le côté de la route, ces formes torturées des roches piquetées de buissons, pas de doute, on est près d’un volcan. Avec toujours en ligne de mire, qui nous domine depuis tout là-haut, le cratère principal de l’Etna et derrière moi la mer qui s’éloigne.

Catane et la mer dans le lointain

Arrivé au refuge de Sapienza, à la fin de ma première ascension de la journée, je suis un peu déçu : on ne voit pas le cratère principal, caché qu’il est par d’autres cratères. Et je n’ose pas laisser le vélo trop longtemps et trop hors de vue (chat échaudé craint l’eau chaude), donc une trop longue randonnée ou un tour en téléférique sont exclus. Après quelques tours des cratères accessibles à pied, je me dis qu’être « déçu » est peut-être un peu fort, les vues sont tout de même assez incroyables. Et j’ai même l’agréable surprise de croiser mes compagnons de petit déjeuner qui font un tour avec le gérant de l’auberge. Le monde (enfin l’Etna) est petit !

Vous pouvez peut-être le deviner sur les photos précédentes, mais j’ai une belle descente qui m’attend. Et le gérant de l’auberge me glisse avant de partir : « Fais attention, il y a beaucoup de sable sur la route – Oui, Oui ». Aussitôt dit, aussitôt oublié, je me lance à fond dans la descente ! Et après près de 40 km de montée, je n’ai pas envie d’appuyer sur les freins. Premier virage, 40 km/h, je prends un peu large, je vois au dernier moment un tas de sable dans le coude, je sens ma roue arrière qui commence à chasser, je n’ose ni freiner, ni tourner mon guidon, je me vois faire un tout droit dans la barrière de sécurité (tout ça se passe bien sûr en une fraction de seconde, le temps de le lire ça s’est déjà produit 4 fois). Mais ce n’était qu’un petit tas de sable, je retrouve rapidement de l’adhérence et une assiette stable. Mais j’ai compris le « Fais attention ». Je comprends aussi un peu ce que peuvent ressentir les gens qui m’ont dit avoir peur en descente. En plus le sable est souvent dans les virages, et je ne le vois qu’au dernier moment…  

En bas en un seul morceau, j’ai juste le temps de remplir les gourdes et je commence la seconde ascension de la journée. Beaucoup dans la forêt (donc à l’ombre, donc au frais) au départ, je profite de chaque opportunité où je vois le cratère principal pour le prendre en photo. Même à contre-jour. Même si c’est la même chose à chaque fois. Et à force de prendre des photos, je me dis « Tiens, c’est marrant ce nuage, on dirait que le volcan fume… »

En y regardant de plus près, je me dis que c’est quand même un gros nuage, et il y a des bruits bizarres aussi. Un orage ? Pourtant le ciel est bien bleu tout autour, je ne suis pas soudain devenu expert en météo mais ça ne ressemble pas à un orage. Je finis par me rendre à l’évidence : je suis en train d’assister à une éruption de l’Etna. J’aurais aimé vous dire que j’ai dû éviter des torrents de lave, esquiver une pluie de roche en fusion, que grâce à mon fidèle destrier j’ai pu porter secours à une famille en détresse et les sortir des flammes de l’enfer, mais j’ai surtout vu beaucoup de fumée. Et les gens autour de moi n’avaient pas l’air si inquiets que ça. Mais ça reste tout de même très impressionnant, à tel point que j’ai complètement oublié de prendre des photos de Piano Provenzana, qui conclut l’ascension de la partie nord de l’Etna. Vous n’aurez donc que des photos de l’éruption…

Ce que je ne manque pas de remarquer en revanche, c’est que la double ration d’Etna a réussi là où la double ration de Ventoux avait échoué : j’ai un nouveau record de dénivelé positif sur une journée : 3.263 m !! Dont la grande majorité dans les 80 premiers kilomètres, ce qui accessoirement veut dire 40 kilomètres de descente, sans sable en plus cette fois, régal ! J’arrive sur la côte, dans le magnifique village de Taormina. Petit tour dans l’eau pour se rafraichir, et je me mets en quête d’un bivouac. Comme la nuit tombe et que les deux chemins qui sont censés me mener un peu à l’écart dans la forêt sont en réalité des chemins privés, je finis par m’installer sur le bord de la route…

Naxos et Taormina
Isola Bella

Le lendemain, je refais la route vers Messine, passe faire un coucou à Poséidon et prends le ferry en direction de l’Italie. Et je reprends la route SS106 là où je l’avais laissée, à Villa San Giovanni, et je continue mon périple, vent dans le dos, vers le bout de la botte. Je remarque par ailleurs que l’Etna ne m’a toujours pas quitté, il veille toujours sur nous depuis l’autre côté du détroit…

L’Etna semble sortir de l’eau

Je compte suivre la côte jusqu’à Crotone, mais je vois un panneau qui indique vers le Nord la direction du parc national d’Aspromonte. Je me rappelle avoir noté quelque part qu’il valait le coup d’y jeter un œil. Je change donc mon itinéraire et me décide de me lancer à l’assaut de ses montagnes ! Lors d’un ravitaillement en eau, je croise un français qui fait aussi le tour de l’Italie à vélo, dans le même sens en plus, avec qui on passe un bon moment à discuter. Au moment de repartir, il se rend compte que sa roue arrière est à plat, et je l’abandonne lâchement à sa réparation… La discussion a été agréable et plus longue que prévue, et je commence les premiers kilomètres de montée vers 18h30. En plus le vent s’est levé, de face, et je commence à trouver le temps long. Je m’arrête dans un supermarché pour m’offrir de quoi améliorer mon quotidien (une bière, un morceau de fromage et une barquette de tomates) et en discutant avec un des employés dans un italien plus qu’approximatif, je finis par comprendre que la route que je comptais prendre est bloquée. Ça commence à faire un peu trop. En plus la route alternative qu’il m’a conseillée (et que je suis) monte très (trop ?) fort, et même si la vue sur la vallée dans la descente est plutôt sympa, j’en ai marre et je m’arrête dans le premier champ où une haie d’arbres me cache un peu de la route.

Le lendemain, après 450m de plat, je commence à monter. C’est dur et ça ne s’arrête pas. Quand je pense être arrivé en haut, quand je me dis : « il m’y a plus d’arbres au-dessus, on ne va pas pouvoir monter beaucoup plus haut », je me prends la prochaine pente à 1000%. Et j’ai l’impression que ça dure au moins 25 km (probablement plutôt autour de 10). Même si la vue sur la vallée est grandiose, j’ai hâte d’arriver au sommet…

S’ensuit une petite partie roulante, dans la forêt, qui me rappelle un peu la République Tchèque (et le souvenir ému de bivouacs dans les bois, sans voitures ni voisins) et j’arrive à une croisée des chemins : à droite, je redescends vers la côte et la mer. À gauche, je continue dans le parc, dans la montagne, avec la promesse d’autres montées. Et bien sûr, je prends à gauche ! Oubliés les derniers kilomètres, les jambes qui brûlent et les montées atroces. Il parait que la mémoire est sélective. Pour me convaincre du bien-fondé de ma décision, je fourbis tout de même de solides arguments : 1. Très peu de voitures. 2. Des sources d’eau fraîche à n’avoir plus soif. 3. Entre 800 et 1.100 m d’altitude, il fait plutôt 25° que 35°. 4. Plus c’est haut, plus c’est beau ! Et une petite voix en moi espère que les montées qui arrivent ne seront pas aussi horribles que celle du matin… Au final j’ai eu tout bon, le plus dur était derrière et le plus beau devant…

Il ne me reste plus qu’à parcourir la courte distance qui me sépare encore de Crotone, l’affaire d’une demi-journée. Qui ne commence d’ailleurs pas pour le mieux, vu que je décide de suivre la nationale, ses poids lourds et autres fous du volant alors qu’une petite route serpente tranquillement à flanc de falaise. Je croise ensuite un type qui me complimente sur mon italien, il est 9h30, je ne sais pas ce qu’il a bu mais ça a l’air efficace. Je parviens même en arrivant en ville à me commander un repas sans un mot d’anglais (je ne sais pas trop ce que je mange, mais en tout cas c’est très bon), et je n’ai pas le cœur de refuser un café quand je vois la réaction de la cheffe à première tentative !

Le Capo Colonna et ses vestiges romains
Un café – Non merci – Vous êtes sûr ? – Bon d’accord

Et pour ceux qui ont du mal à suivre avec tous ces noms, un petit point sur la carte :